Assessing the influence of social and emotional intelligence in effective educational leadership

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Stroud, James C.
dc.contributor.author Kline, Anthony M.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-08-04T19:14:28Z
dc.date.available 2011-08-05T05:30:04Z
dc.date.created 2011-07-23
dc.date.issued 2011-07-23
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/194895
dc.description.abstract The primary purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between principals’ social and emotional skills and the academic and social outcomes of their schools. The Social-Emotional Educational Leadership Factor (SELF) survey was completed by 27 Indiana public elementary school principals and 30 Indiana public elementary school teachers to analyze the perceptions of the principals’ social and emotional skills. Results showed that principals’ self perceptions of their social and emotional skills predicted 49% of the variability of how they perceived their skills affecting their school’s academic success (R = .70, p < .01). A larger 57% of the variability was predicted from teachers’ perceptions of how their principal’s social and emotional skills affected their school’s academic success (R = .76, p < .01), while principals’ self perceptions of their social and emotional skills predicted 33% of the variance in iv student attendance rates. Results also indicated that principals and their teachers differed on their perceptions of principals’ skills (Wilk’s λ = .33, p < .001), as principals’ self evaluations of social and emotional skills were consistently more positive than the teachers’ evaluations of their principal’s social and emotional skills. It was determined that teachers’ perceptions of their principal’s social and emotional skills predicted 82% of the variability of their assessment regarding their principals’ overall leadership abilities. An in-depth analysis of six participating schools indicated that academic and socially underperforming schools consistently had lower average social and emotional skill scores throughout the SELF survey when compared to academic and socially performing schools. Finally, teachers tended to believe at higher rates that principals’ social and emotional skills can affect the principals’ ability to lead when compared to the responses of the principals. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Elementary Education
dc.subject.lcsh Social intelligence
dc.subject.lcsh Emotional intelligence
dc.subject.lcsh Educational leadership
dc.subject.lcsh Elementary school principals--Attitudes
dc.subject.lcsh Elementary school teachers--Attitudes
dc.title Assessing the influence of social and emotional intelligence in effective educational leadership en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.date.liftdate 2011-08-05
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1653348


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account