The role of the right hemisphere in processing sarcasm in Asperger's disorder

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Holtgraves, Thomas
dc.contributor.author Smucker, Darren M.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-23T19:58:52Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-24T06:30:21Z
dc.date.created 2011-12-17
dc.date.issued 2011-12-17
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/195172
dc.description.abstract Individuals with Asperger’s Disorder (AD) have difficulty with social interactions and understanding sarcasm. One source of these deficits is the deficient use of pragmatic language. Right hemispheric (RH) dysfunction has been linked to trouble understanding sarcasm and using pragmatic language. This study attempted to determine the role of the RH in sarcasm comprehension by using a computerized dichotic listening task. Participants with AD were matched with typically developing participants and completed a dichotic listening task, brief intelligence assessment and a perceived accuracy questionnaire. The results showed participants from both groups performed similarly on the dichotic listening task. Interestingly, those with AD did not appear to have insight into their ability to identify sarcastic or sincere tones while the typically developing group did.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Psychological Science
dc.subject.lcsh Cerebral hemispheres
dc.subject.lcsh Neurolinguistics
dc.subject.lcsh Asperger's syndrome--Patients
dc.subject.lcsh Irony
dc.title The role of the right hemisphere in processing sarcasm in Asperger's disorder en_US
dc.title.alternative Role of RH in processing sarcasm in AD
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.date.liftdate 2012-01-24
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1661335


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Master's Theses [5318]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account