Relations among interparental conflict, parenting practices and emotion regulation during emerging adulthood

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dc.contributor.advisor Paulson, Sharon E.
dc.contributor.author Gong, Xiaopeng
dc.date.accessioned 2013-08-01T17:56:21Z
dc.date.available 2013-08-01T17:56:21Z
dc.date.created 2013-08-01
dc.date.issued 2013-07-20
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/197392
dc.description.abstract This study examined the influence of parenting-related factors to emerging adults’ emotion regulation, especially in the context of interparental conflict. Specifically, the purpose of the study was to examine how interparental conflict, parenting (defined as parental psychological control, autonomy support, and behavioral control), and parentchild relations (defined as parent-child attachment) are related to emerging adults’ emotion regulation. In addition, do parenting behaviors (psychological control, autonomy support, and behavioral control) and parent-child attachment mediate the relations between interparental conflict and emotion regulation? A total of 361 college students reported their perceptions of interparental conflict, their parents’ parenting practices, parent-child attachment, as well as their emotion regulation capabilities. The majority of the participants were females (n = 292), and Caucasians (n = 322) with an average age of 20.23 (SD = 1.39) years. In general, the participants reported moderate interparental conflict, relatively low psychological control and behavioral control, moderate levels of parental autonomy support, and high parent-child attachment, along with relatively high emotion regulation capabilities. With regression analyses, the results showed that emerging adults who reported higher levels of resolution of interparental conflict, moderate levels of parental behavioral control, greater attachment communication, and lower levels of alienation from parents were associated with better emotion regulation. Path analyses were used to test the role of parenting and attachment in mediating the relations between interparental conflict and emotion regulation. Results demonstrated that parental behavioral control, autonomy support, and parent-child attachment partially mediated the role of resolution of interparental conflict on emotion regulation. In addition, parental behavioral control and autonomy support partially mediated the impact of resolution of interparental conflict on emerging adults’ alienation from parents. In particular, resolution of interparental conflict was the strongest predictor of emerging adults’ emotion regulation capability, even when parenting practices and parent-child attachment were controlled. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Psychology
dc.subject.lcsh Marital conflict
dc.subject.lcsh Parenting
dc.subject.lcsh Parent and child
dc.subject.lcsh Emotions
dc.subject.lcsh Control (Psychology)
dc.subject.lcsh Young adults -- Psychology
dc.title Relations among interparental conflict, parenting practices and emotion regulation during emerging adulthood en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1719997


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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