Those quirky, shy kids : comparison of Hikikomori in four types of Japanese media

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dc.contributor.advisor Tomizawa, Sadatoshi
dc.contributor.author Van Gorp, Alexander C.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-08-12T17:33:37Z
dc.date.available 2013-08-12T17:33:37Z
dc.date.created 2013-05
dc.date.issued 2013-05
dc.identifier.other A-347
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/197601
dc.description.abstract Since the term was first created in 1998, Hikikomori has been a fascinating aspect in the discussion of Japanese culture. This mental disorder describing those who shut themselves away from humanity for extended periods of time has been frequently used as a trait among characters in various forms of Japanese media. The analysis of four different characters, one each from film, literature, graphic novels, and animated television shows, begins to display how Hikikomori is portrayed within Japanese culture. I compare these four characters to discover any comparisons and contrasts as well as similarities among them and then relate the characters to real-life studies about Hikikomori.
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.subject.lcsh Sociology.
dc.title Those quirky, shy kids : comparison of Hikikomori in four types of Japanese media en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis.
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1709439


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5596]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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