Exploring the spatiotemporal impact of the Chicago Large Lot Program on incidents of neighborhood crime

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dc.contributor.advisor Yoo, Sanglim
dc.contributor.author Stransky, Steven
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-01T13:17:45Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-01T13:17:45Z
dc.date.issued 2018-05-05
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201189
dc.description.abstract This paper analyzes the spatiotemporal impact of the City of Chicago’s Large Lot Program on incidents of neighborhood crime. The results suggest that property and drug crimes statistically significantly decreased from 2013 through 2017 in areas within 500 feet of lots sold in the program’s 2014 pilot program. Property crimes included reported arsons, burglaries, criminal damages, criminal trespassing, motor vehicle thefts, and thefts. Drug crimes included reported narcotics crimes. The study also suggests that violent crimes decreased from 2013-2017 but that the decrease was not statistically-significant. Violent crimes included reported assaults, criminal sexual assaults, homicides, human trafficking, kidnappings, robberies, and sex offenses. The analysis was conducted by using the ESRI ArcGIS emerging hot spot analysis and optimized hot spot analysis tools. en_US
dc.title Exploring the spatiotemporal impact of the Chicago Large Lot Program on incidents of neighborhood crime en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.U.R.P.) en_US


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  • Research Papers [4975]
    Research papers submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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