Adolescent Work and Alcohol Use: Moderation by Neighborhood Context and the Role of Peers

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dc.contributor.author Rocheleau, Gregory C.
dc.contributor.author Swisher, Raymond R.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-05T14:47:16Z
dc.date.available 2018-10-05T14:47:16Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11-08
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201400
dc.description Article published in Deviant Behavior, 38 (11), 2016. Version of Record found at https://doi.org/10.1080/01639625.2016.1248712. en_US
dc.description.abstract Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), this study looks at the adolescent work and binge drinking relationship among a sample of 4,826 adolescents. The paper assesses variability in the work-binge drinking relationship by social class and neighborhood disadvantage and seeks to explain variability by considering social control and social learning processes. Results reveal that the detrimental relationships between work intensity and binge drinking are stronger for those from more advantaged neighborhoods. Results also show that perceived peer substance use explains neighborhood disadvantage differences in the relationship between intense work and binge drinking. en_US
dc.subject adolescent work en_US
dc.subject substance use en_US
dc.subject social class en_US
dc.subject criminological theory en_US
dc.title Adolescent Work and Alcohol Use: Moderation by Neighborhood Context and the Role of Peers en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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