Liberal applications : the relationship between academic major and sociopolitical attitudes

Cardinal Scholar

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dc.contributor.advisor Petts, Richard J.
dc.contributor.author Power, Olivia J.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-12T18:49:21Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-12T18:49:21Z
dc.date.issued 2018-05
dc.identifier.other A-388
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201457
dc.description.abstract For many students, coming to college presents opportunities for increased independence. When many students enter Ball State, they are at an age where they are able to register to vote for the first time, and may be thinking about political issues deeply for the first time in their lives. This quantitative and qualitative study aims to decipher whether differences among students' political views have a relationship with their academic major, and the reasons behind these relationships. Quantitative analysis of 205 surveys revealed that these relationships do exist, and qualitative interviews with 9 students gives further insight into why these differences exist. Studying the major groups of social science, communications, business, hard science, double majors, criminal justice, education, humanities, CAP, theater, and computer science, this study provides some insight into Ball State's political canvas which may be of use to college students and faculty alike. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.subject.lcsh Sociology.
dc.title Liberal applications : the relationship between academic major and sociopolitical attitudes en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis.
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?) en_US


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5596]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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