Non-cognitive attributes: correlations to high ability students' academic achievement

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dc.contributor.advisor Quick, Marilynn
dc.contributor.author Clevenger, Alicia Jean
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-06T16:41:24Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-06T16:41:24Z
dc.date.issued 2018-12-15
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201482
dc.description.abstract Using identified high ability students’ survey data and NWEA reading and math achievement scores from four Indiana school districts, this study investigated the relationship between students’ perceptions of growth mindset and grit and academic achievement while controlling for teacher feedback, student self-regulation, and goal orientation. This study was a quantitative correlational design using cross-sectional data. To analyze the relationship between high ability students’ growth mindset and grit and academic achievement, a simultaneous multiple regression was performed. To determine if growth mindset and grit predicted academic achievement, an ANOVA test was conducted. To analyze the relationship between high ability students’ growth mindset and grit and academic achievement while controlling for the teacher variables, a hierarchical multiple regression was performed. The results of this study did not indicate growth mindset and grit had a significant correlation with academic achievement while controlling for the teacher variables. However, self-regulation significantly correlated with reading achievement scores. Additionally, significant data regarding gender and math achievement and school setting and growth mindset resulted. The implications discussed include encouraging high ability educators promoting self-regulated learning in their classrooms. Additionally, educators should be promoting the malleability of math intelligence through growth mindset interventions and providing appropriate professional development so elementary teachers develop both strong math skills and positive math attitudes. The last implication suggests teaching students about neuroplasticity, which may elicit more student effort, perseverance when faced with academic adversity, and positively influence overall academic achievement. en_US
dc.title Non-cognitive attributes: correlations to high ability students' academic achievement en_US
dc.title.alternative Non-cognitive attributes and high ability students en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3071]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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