NAGPRA : a history of tribal relations with the U.S. government, and the importance of tribal voices in repatriation

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dc.contributor.advisor Murray, Cailin
dc.contributor.author Roberts, Nichole
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-06T19:32:30Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-06T19:32:30Z
dc.date.issued 2018-05
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/201649
dc.description.abstract When Europeans first arrived on this continent, they were surprised to find a race of people already living here. Since that time, relationships between Euro-American governments and tribal leaders have been a complex tapestry with varying balances of power. This project will give a brief overview of the history of these relationships, but its main purpose is to inform the general public about the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990 and its continuing importance to Native American tribes. Repatriation is a complicated process, and the United States government has a troubling history of ignoring native voices in matters regarding native peoples. The goal of this project is to emphasize the importance of native voices in deciding what to do with native remains and how to teach about native cultures. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.subject.lcsh Anthropology.
dc.title NAGPRA : a history of tribal relations with the U.S. government, and the importance of tribal voices in repatriation en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis.
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?) en_US


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5463]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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