The effects of sensory awareness training on self-actualization in a personal growth group

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dc.contributor.advisor Mitchell, Peter M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Barrick, Glen Anthony en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:22:54Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:22:54Z
dc.date.created 1979 en_US
dc.date.issued 1979
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1979 .B37 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/174959
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sensory awareness training on self-actualization in a personal growth group. The null hypothesis pertained to the differences in self-actualization between treatment and control groups as measured by the Inner Directedness Scale of the Personal Orientation Inventory.The subjects were undergraduate students from a Midwest university who volunteered to participate in a Personal Growth Group. Based on their time availability, a.m. or p.m., the sample of 116 subjects was randomly assigned to four treatment, four control, or two reserve groups, so as to maintain proportional samples of females and males. Because of attrition prior to the group experience, some reserve subjects were randomly assigned to some treatment and control groups so that the final sample was composed of 88 subjects (57 females and 31 males). Forty-four of these subjects experienced one of four treatment groups (10 or 12 subjects per group) and the other 44 subjects experienced one of four control groups (10 or 12 subjects per group).Both experimental and control groups were one and one-half hour long personal growth groups designed to develop human potential, increase awareness of self and others, and to increase skills in interpersonal relationships. The difference between the groups was that the treatment groups received instructions which stressed, emphasized, and sought to stimulate aspects of sensory awareness, while the control group instructions minimized sensory awareness experiences.Immediately following the group session, all subjects were administered the Personal Orientation Inventory. The instruments were scored and the differences between the average raw scores of the Inner Directedness Scale of the POI were subjected to a univariate analysis of variance, with the differences considered significant at the .05 level. Preliminary to testing the null hypothesis, all other main effects had been controlled and computed F value for effect due to interaction between groups and sex (F = .329, p< .568) was not significant.control groups as measured by the I Scale of the POI. Therefore, it is concluded that, using this one and one-half hour scripted personal growth group approach, the sensory awareness. training did riot produce a significant positive change in self-actualization as measured by the aforementionedThe computed F value for the group effect (F = 1.273, p < .263) was not significant. Therefore, the null hypothesis—There will be no significant difference between the experimental and control group subjects’ average raw scores on the Inner Directedness Scale of the Personal Orientation Inventory, controlling for any effects due to fascilitator, time, and sex—was not rejected.Analysis of the data indicated that there was no significant difference in self-actualization between the experimental and control groups as measured by the I Scale of the POI. Therefore, it is concluded that, using this one and one-half hour scripted personal growth group approach, the sensory awareness training did not produce a significant positive change in self-actualization as measured by the aforementioned instrument scale. Use of the pre-structured script disallowed flexibility of sensory awareness training activities. The group members had to "flow" with the script, rather than the script "flow" to meet the needs of the group.Data was also collected through subjects completing a questionnaire concerning their reactions to the group experience. These secondary data were descriptive in nature and were not treated statistically. An analysis of these data indicated that both experimental and control group subjects valued the growth group experience and expanded their human potentials, especially in the areas of self and other awareness. Finally, these data indicated there may have been a lack of process difference between the experimental and control groups. Specifically, some aspects of sensory awareness training might have been reduced further in the control groups. en_US
dc.format.extent 3, vii, 127 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Self-actualization (Psychology) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Sensory reinforcement. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Group psychotherapy. en_US
dc.title The effects of sensory awareness training on self-actualization in a personal growth group en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/263475 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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