The effect of human relations training on empathic understanding, self-concept, and the clinical performance of sophomore student nurses

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Duckworth, Jane C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Blackburn, Della A. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:23:17Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:23:17Z
dc.date.created 1982 en_US
dc.date.issued 1982
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1982 .B5 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175120
dc.description.abstract A posttest only experimental design was used to determine the effect of specific training in human relations skills on empathic understanding, self-concept, and the clinical performance of sophomore student nurses in a baccalaureate program.Forty-six students were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, or a control group. The Microcounseling System of Ivey and Gluckstern was used to provide two levels of human relations training in ten one-hour sessions. Experimental group 1 (El) received training through group exercises, manual and videotaped models, practice including videotaping, and evaluation and feedback. Experimental group 2 (E2) was only provided with a manual and videotaped materials. The control group (Cl) met for the same number of sessions, but did not receive any training.Carkhuff's Index of Discrimination (SEU) was used to measure empathic understanding. Four subscales of the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS), total positive, self-criticism, net conflict, and total conflict were used to assess self-concept. The Clinical Evaluation Tool (CET) used to measure clinical performance was developed from Myrick and Kelly's Counselor Evaluation Rating Scale and the current sophomore clinical evaluation form.Six hypotheses were tested with significance for all tests set at the .05 level. A single classification analysis of variance was used on all data to determine whether groups differed on any test variable. The results of the statistical analyses failed to reach significance.Post hoc comparisons were then carried out to determine if El>C1 on any test variable. These tests revealed significance (p<.05) in empathic understanding, in TSCS self-criticism, and in clinical performance.The following conclusions were drawn:1. Sophomore student nurses exposed to specific training in human relations skills demonstrated a higher level of empathic understanding.2. Sophomore student nurses exposed to specific training in human relations skills were more aware of self-critical perceptions.3. Sophomore student nurses exposed to specific training in human relations skills received higher ratings on clinical performance.As a result of this study a decision was made to include human relations training for student nurses at the sophomore and junior levels. en_US
dc.format.extent iii, 71 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing students -- Psychology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Interpersonal relations. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nurse and patient. en_US
dc.title The effect of human relations training on empathic understanding, self-concept, and the clinical performance of sophomore student nurses en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/386943 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Doctoral Dissertations [3090]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account