Self-concept as a predictor of resiliency in gifted adolescents

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dc.contributor.advisor Kruczek, Theresa A. en_US
dc.contributor.author Blankenbuehler, Stacy J. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:23:17Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:23:17Z
dc.date.created 2006 en_US
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 2006 .B59 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175125
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this research study was to identify which dimensions of self-concept were predictive of depression and anxiety in gifted adolescents in a residential academic setting. Additionally, this study compared mean scores of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescents (MMPI-A; Butcher, et, al, 1992) to normative data. A total of 278 high school juniors and seniors from the Indiana Academy completed both the Self Description Questionnaire III (Marsh, 1984) and the MMPI-A. After screening data on the basis of MMPI-A validity scales, the final sample of 222 students consisted of 128 females and 94 males.Simultaneous multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify which dimensions of self-concept were related to depression and anxiety. Frequency data was generated to compare the MMPI-A profiles to normative scores.Three dimensions of self-concept; Same-Sex, Emotional Stability, and General Self-Esteem were found to predict depression. Five dimensions of self-concept; Verbal, Problem-Solving Ability, Same-Sex, Emotional Stability, and General Self-Esteem were found to predict anxiety. Frequency data showed 10% of the sample fell in the clinically elevated range on the MMPI-A Depression scale and only 6% of the sample fell in the clinically elevated range on the MMPI-A Anxiety scale.Future research on protective factors in gifted youth should utilize a more heterogeneous sample. In addition, future research should be longitudinal in order to identify causality in the relationship. Implications for counseling psychologists include providing social skills training to enhance social self-concept. Additional implications include providing programming to increase opportunities to practice social skills. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services
dc.format.extent vi, 65 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Self-perception in adolescence. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Gifted teenagers -- Psychology. en_US
dc.title Self-concept as a predictor of resiliency in gifted adolescents en_US
dc.title.alternative Self concept as a predictor of resiliency in gifted adolescents en_US
dc.title.alternative Resiliency in gifted adolescents en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1343466 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3090]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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