An impact model for evaluating 4-H programs for the handicapped child

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dc.contributor.advisor Wagner, Ivan D. en_US
dc.contributor.author Branson, Floyd en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-in en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:23:28Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:23:28Z
dc.date.created 1980 en_US
dc.date.issued 1980
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1980 .B72 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175208
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to (1) determine the number of handicapped children being served by 4-H programs of the Indiana Cooperative Extension Service, (2) describe the organization and the presentation of the programs, and (3) develop a model for evaluating the impact a 4-H program for handicapped children has on the administration of the total 4-H program being offered in the county. For purposes of the study, the term handicapped referred to children that were emotionally disturbed, learning disabled, mentally retarded, and/or physically handicapped.The population for the study included all Extension Agents-Youth of the Indiana Cooperative Extension Service in each of the 92 Indiana counties. Where more than one Extension Agent-Youth was employed in a county, only one response was requested as the needed information concerned the total county 4-H program being offered.A questionnaire, developed from a review of selected literature, was used as the method to gather data from the study group. The survey instrument was submitted to a group of 20 doctoral students and three professors of Educational Administration and Supervision for recommendations, subsequently revised and mailed to the study population.Counties where 4-H programs for handicapped children have been developed were identified. Extension Agents-Youth working the counties where 4-H programs for handicapped children existed were asked questions regarding (1) the number of handicapped children being served in the county, (2) how the 4-H programs for handicapped children were organized and presented, and (3) the percent of impact the development of a 4-H program for handicapped children had on the total county 4-H program in the specific areas of (a) personnel and staffing, (b) facilities, (c) materials and supplies, (d) finance, (e) time allocation and (f) the overall expenditure of the program. In addition, Extension AgentsYouth were asked questions regarding specific perceptions of the 4-H program for handicapped children in relation to the total 4-H program being offered in the county.Data received from the questionnaire were compiled and used to provide an account of the involvement of handicapped children in 4-H programs in Indiana. Responses from the different Extension Agents-Youth in the 92 counties where 4-H programs for handicapped children existed were analyzed, summarized, and reported in table and narrative form.The findings and conclusions of the study support the following recommendations:1. Additional research in the study of increased 4-H programming for handicapped children is greatly needed.2. Formal programs and in-service training designed to provide proper and adequate training for leaders of 4-H programs for handicapped children should be increased.3. Extension Agents-Youth and leaders of 4-H programs for handicapped children should become more familiar with current laws affecting educational programming for handicapped children. 4. Additional guidelines for organizing, developing, and implementing 4-H programs for handicapped children should be considered by Extension personnel. 5. Documentation regarding the number of handicapped children participating in 4-H programs should be more thoroughly recorded by Extension personnel and reported to the State Extension Office. 6. Since the life blood of 4-H programs for the handicapped is the volunteer leader, efforts should be increased to recruit highly motivated, sincere individuals with a keen interest in working with special children.7. A task force of representatives of special educators and Extension Agents- Youth should be established to explore the need for possible programs. en_US
dc.format.extent viii, 135 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh 4-H clubs -- Indiana. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Children with disabilities -- Education. en_US
dc.subject.other Indiana Cooperative Extension Service. Extension Agents-Youth. en_US
dc.title An impact model for evaluating 4-H programs for the handicapped child en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/264166 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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