A comparison of selected areas of thinking styles between cooperating teachers and university supervisors

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dc.contributor.advisor Jones, Donald W. en_US
dc.contributor.author Cleary, Michael James en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:24:15Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:24:15Z
dc.date.created 1987 en_US
dc.date.issued 1987
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1987 .C54 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175564
dc.description.abstract The purposes of this study were to ascertain the thinking styles of a selected sample group of cooperating teachers and university supervisors and to denote the differences between the thinking styles. The populations included 122 selected cooperating teachers and 31 selected university supervisors.Cooperating teachers and university supervisors completed the Level 1: Life Styles Inventory which contained 240 short phrases and words producing a twelve-dimension thinking style. Seventy-two cooperating teachers and twenty-five university supervisors were included in data analysis.Thinking style profiles of cooperating teachers and university supervisors were derived from mean and standard deviation scores on twelve thinking style scales.Twelve null hypotheses were tested to identify thinking style differences between cooperating teachers and university supervisors on twelve scales. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) followed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were the statistical treatments utilized to analyze data at the .05 level. Analysis of data relevant to total Level 1: Life Style Inventory responses and to each hypothesis resulted in the following findings: 1. Mean responses of participating cooperating teachers and university supervisors indicated strong orientations toward humanistic-helpful, affiliative, achievement, and self-actualized dimensions of thinking style.2. No significant differences existed between cooperating teachers and university supervisors on the twelve thinking style scales considered collectively.3. Individual thinking style scales with no significant differences were:(a) humanistic-helpful, (b) affiliative, (c) approval, (d) dependent, (e) avoidance, (f) oppositional, (g) power, (h) competition, (i) competence, (j) achievement, and (f) self-actualization.4. A significant difference existed between cooperatingteachers and university supervisors on the thinking style scale classified as "conventional." en_US
dc.format.extent 3, vii, 108 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Student teachers -- Supervision of. en_US
dc.title A comparison of selected areas of thinking styles between cooperating teachers and university supervisors en_US
dc.description.notes Title from approval sheet.
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/514709 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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