A study to determine the influence exerted by the Indiana Comprehensive Assessment and Program Planning System on the Eighteen basic principles of the Middle School

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dc.contributor.advisor Snyder, Jack F. en_US
dc.contributor.author Cooley, Van Edwin en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-in en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:24:21Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:24:21Z
dc.date.created 1982 en_US
dc.date.issued 1982
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1982 .C66 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/175615
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to determine which of the Eighteen Basic Middle School Principles were influenced by the Indiana Comprehensive Assessment and Program Planning System (CAPPS) based on perceptions of middle school principals. A second purpose was to determine the extent of influence (positive, negative, no influence) exerted by CAPPS on the Eighteen Basic Middle School Principles.A survey instrument consisting of eighteen items in five Likert-response categories was mailed to: one-hundred randomly selected middle school principals in Indiana. Space was provided for respondents to write a statement describing how CAPPS influenced each middle school principle. Sixty-two middle school principals responded to the survey.Middle school principles most influenced by CAPPS were basic skill repair and extension, and planned gradualism. Principles least influenced were continuous progress programs, intramural activities, social experiences, independent study and auxiliary staffing. Sixty-five percent of responding principals indicated CAPPS exerted no influence on the combined eighteen principles.Conclusions derived from data revealed although CAPPS was not perceived as exerting a major influence, it was seen as positive. CAPPS has influenced textbook, material selection and increased articulation between grade levels. Emphasis on basic skill areas and remediation have increased due to CAPPS.Rationale for the middle school was to meet developmental opmental needs of transescent youth. However, the middle school concept has been implemented for a variety of reasons including dissatisfaction with the junior high school and reorganization of grade, levels to facilitate. desegregation and changing enrollments.Recommendations for further research include assess merit of educators to determine understanding of CAPPS and the middle school concept. Research also needs to be conducted to determine if educators are following CAPPS guidelines. en_US
dc.format.extent 3, viii, 159 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Middle schools -- Indiana. en_US
dc.subject.other Indiana Comprehensive Assessment and Program Planning System (CAPPS) en_US
dc.title A study to determine the influence exerted by the Indiana Comprehensive Assessment and Program Planning System on the Eighteen basic principles of the Middle School en_US
dc.title.alternative Eighteen basic principles of the Middle School. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/385731 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3090]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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