A study of student responses to selected interpretations of American history

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dc.contributor.advisor Schreiber, Joan E. en_US
dc.contributor.author Elwell, William Charles, 1940- en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:25:17Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:25:17Z
dc.date.created 1970 en_US
dc.date.issued 1970
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1970 .E48 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/176061
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to determine if students change their responses to selected interpretations of American history after participating in a course in American history. The analysis of the responses was based upon interpretations in a measuring device titled, "Student Responses to Selected Interpretations of American History." This measuring device was created for this study by the researcher.The research was planned to answer the question, "Do students change their responses to selected interpretations of American history at a statistically significant level after participating in a course in American history?"The investigator collected responses to the pre-test and post-test administration of the measuring device from six hundred and fourteen eleventh grade students. An additional eighty-seven responses from sophomores were collected for purposes of comparison with the juniors. The subjects were students from two senior high schools in Indiana. The subjects represented a heterogeneity of socio-economic status, race and achievement levels. The six hundred and fourteen juniors participated in a course in Americanhistory. The eighty-seven sophomores were enrolled in a course in world history at those two schools.Statistical processing of the data consisted of determining the significance of the proportion of changed responses to the measuring device. Coefficients of correlations of proportional change were computed on the basis of sex, intelligence test scores, and grade point averages. An analysis of the difference in proportion of change between sophomores and juniors was also computed. Analysis of the data led to the following findings:Students who had participated in the course in American history at the eleventh grade level changed their responses at a statistically significant level for forty-three of the interpretations.There was no correlation between sex and the proportion of change for forty-three of the interpretations.There was no correlation between intelligence test scores and the proportion of change for forty-three of the interpretations.There was no correlation between grade point average and proportion of change for thirty-eight of the interpretations. For two of the interpretations students with higher grade point averages were more likely to change their responses and for five of the interpretations students with higher grade point averages were less likely to change their responses than were students with a lower grade point average.Students who had participated in the course in American history were more likely to change their responses to ten of the interpretations than were students who had not participated in the course in American history. There was no statistically significant difference between these two groups' proportion of change for thirty-five of the interpretations.The following conclusions have been drawn from the findings:1. Students who had participated in the course in American history at the eleventh grade level changed their responses at a statistically significant level for forty-three of the interpretations.2. There was no significant correlation between sex and the proportion of change for forty-three of the interpretations.3. There was no significant correlation between intelligence test scores and the proportion of change for forty-three of the interpretations.4. There was no significant correlation between grade point average and the proportion of change for thirty-eight of the interpretations. For two of the interpretations, students with higher grade point averages were more likely to change their responses and for five of the interpretations students with higher grade point averages were less likely to changetheir responses than were students with lower grade point averages.5. There was no statistically significant difference between the proportion of change for juniors and sophomores for thirty five of the interpretations. Students who had participated in the course in American history were more likely to change their responses to ten of the interpretations than were students who had not participated in the course in American history. en_US
dc.format.extent iv, 69 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.other United States -- History -- Study and teaching. en_US
dc.subject.other United States -- History -- Philosophy. en_US
dc.title A study of student responses to selected interpretations of American history en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/414706 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3090]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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