The relationship between sex-role stereotyping and the mathematic achievement of academically-talented tenth grade females

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dc.contributor.advisor Ballou, Philip E. (Philip Edwin), 1925- en_US
dc.contributor.author Emerick, Janet L. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:25:17Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:25:17Z
dc.date.created 1987 en_US
dc.date.issued 1987
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1987 .E44 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/176066
dc.description.abstract The study examined the relationship between the sexrole stereotyping and the mathematic achievement of academicallytalented tenth grade females. The sample was drawn from two middle schools and one high school in the Lake Central School Corporation, St. John, Indiana. The sample included students in grades six and ten. The sixth grade sample was used forinstruments: the quantitative battery of the Houghton Mifflin Cognitive Abilities Test (CAT), the mathematics computation and mathematics concepts batteries of the CTB/McGraw-Hill Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills (CTBS), and the Maferr Inventories of Feminine and Masculine Values. There was not a significant decline in the quantitative achievement of scores of academically-talented tenth grade females as determined by achievement scores from the females' seventh, eighth and tenth grade CTBS test. There were no significant differences in the seventh, eighth and tenth grade quantitative achievement scores of academically-talented tenth grade females as compared to male peers. A weak negative correlation was found between the non-significant changes of the tenth comparative purposes only. There werethree data gathering grade females' CTBS score means for seventh, eighth and tenth grade and the females' inclination toward family orientation, self orientation or a balance between the two as perceived the way the females actually were and, then, perceived the way the females' ideal woman would respond. Additional analysis resulted in the following: 1) tenth grade females indicated that the ideal female would be inclined toward self orientation; 2) sixth grade females indicated that the ideal female would be inclined toward a balance between family orientation and self orientation; and 3) sixth grade females were inclined to be self oriented, while sixth grade males were inclined toward an even distribution among the three - family orientation, balanced and self orientation. Recommendations for further research included: choosing an achievement test that would provide more differentiation (an out-of-level test might be considered); conducting a longitudinal study, following the sample through five years of school; finding a better method of gathering sex-role stereotyping data; increasingthe sample size; and locating a more representative geographic location for the study. en_US
dc.format.extent 127 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mathematics -- Study and teaching (Secondary) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Women -- Education. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Sex role. en_US
dc.title The relationship between sex-role stereotyping and the mathematic achievement of academically-talented tenth grade females en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/515489 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3090]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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