Survey of attitudes and perceptions of school board presidents, administrators, and teachers concerning ESEA Title III program

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dc.contributor.advisor Park, Don L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Hutchinson, John Alvin, 1940- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:27:09Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:27:09Z
dc.date.created 1975 en_US
dc.date.issued 1975
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1975 .H87 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/176985
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to compare differences in perceptions of officials and personnel of educational agencies according to the following criteria: geographic region; corporation size; and frequency of participation.This study was designed to assess perceptions regarding: needs assessment; evaluation; dissemination; innovation; cooperation; decision-making; released time; diffusion; interpersonal relationships; status of education; community relationships; post-graduate education; reading of officials; and class size.The respondents included: board presidents; superintendents; central office administrators; principals; and teachers.Data processing consisted of determining percentages of respondents selecting potential choices on a thirty-nine item questionnaire. Items were analyzed according to region, agency size, and frequency of participation.Prior assessments resulted in conflicting findings. The literature, before August, 1973, failed to confirm or refute the value of sampled programs.Data indicate the respondents have not made use of assessment instruments to define appropriateness of content included in curricula.Data indicate the problems inherent in evaluation are not viewed as a deterrent to effective evaluation.Data indicate that innovative educational practices have not received extensive coverage by newspapers.Data indicate that among respondents an inverse relationship exists between an individuals position in the educational hierarchy and direct communication about innovation. Data also indicate that professional personnel made more positive statements concerning innovation in 1973 and 1967. Data reveal the amount of independent study and number of instructional areas allowing independent study has increased since 1967.Data indicate that cooperative efforts by staff to improve the quality of education offered to students has increased since 1967.Data show that more decisions concerning innovation were made by professional personnel, below the rank of superintendent, in 1973 than 1967. Data reveal that cognitive and affective objectives are formulated one year or less in advance of utilization.Data indicate that most school governing bodies have not increased the number of days of released time provided for the improvement of instruction. Data show the availability of materials and equipment has become an important factor in improvement of instruction.Data indicate that assistance offered to students by teachers for the development of effective study and work habits has increased since 1967.Data indicate that assistance provided for the improvement of instruction has increased since 1967.Data show the diffusion of information about participation was unsuccessful in most school districts.Data reveal that the quality of college preparatory and vocational curricula has increased since 1967. Data indicate the number of educational options available to students has increased since 1967.Data indicate the acceptance of innovation has increased since 1967, but acceptance is reduced by increased levels of responsibility. Data reveal the conviction among teachers that pupils interfering with learning opportunities of other students should be excluded from school, has increased since 1967. Data show the treatment of students as responsible individuals by professional staff has increased since 1967.Data indicate the amount of time spent dealing with contemporary issues has increased since 1967. Data show that an education received in an authoritarian school system is the best preparation for citizenship in a democratic society has decreased since 1967.Data indicate the amount of observable evidence, of cooperation between administrators and school patrons for the improvement of education offered students, has increased since 1967. Data show the amount of observable evidence, of cooperation between teachers and school patrons, has increased since 1967.Data indicate the amount of financial incentives, offered to professional personnel to encourage additional graduate study, has not increased since 1967.Data show the reading of professional literature has increased since 1967.Data reveal that no consistent relationship exists between the frequency of participation and the patterns of responses by individuals participating in this study. en_US
dc.format.extent xxiii, 262 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Educational law and legislation. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Education -- Finance. en_US
dc.subject.other United States. Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. en_US
dc.title Survey of attitudes and perceptions of school board presidents, administrators, and teachers concerning ESEA Title III program en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/415162 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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