Grassroots computer education : a study of computer user groups and the model they provide for learning to cope with new technology

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dc.contributor.advisor Weaver, Roy A., 1947- en_US
dc.contributor.author Ludden, Laverne Lee en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:28:21Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:28:21Z
dc.date.created 1985 en_US
dc.date.issued 1985
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1985 .L83 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/177850
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the organizational structure of computer user groups and what roles they play in adult computer learning. The research consisted of two stages that used triangulation methodology.The pilot study involved a survey, which used a 34 item questionnaire, answered by 128 persons. The second stage consisted of a nationwide survey, which used a 57 item questionnaire, telephone interviews, and content analysis of newsletters. The nationwide survey was answered by 72 groups, representing 55,222 members.Findings1. Computer user groups were a major provider of computer learning for adults in the United States.2. Computer user groups were one form of autonomous learning groups.3. Computer user groups existed in all parts of the United States and tended to have a formal organization.4. Members of computer user groups were typically over 35, had a high family income, were college graduates, and were male.5. Members of computer user groups preferred self-directed learning and peer led learning to classes at educational institutions.Recommendations1. Adult and community educators should study other autonomous learning groups to discover the role that they play in adult learning.2. Practical research should be conducted to determine if and how educational institutions can best assist autonomous learning groups.3. Adult and community education practitioners should survey their local communities to identify autonomous learning groups and determine methods that can be used to cooperate with these groups.4. Adult and community educators should identify local computer user groups and determine how their educational institutions could cooperate with computer user groups.5. More innovative programming should be conducted by adult and community educators that takes advantage of the learning model provided by computer user groups.6. Training and development personnel should examine the potential benefits of implementing computer user groups and other autonomous learning groups within their organizations to promote learning new knowledge and skills.ConclusionComputer user groups were organized primarily to assist their members in learning more about computers. In addition to satisfying the learning needs of members, the groups provided supplemental services that supported other computer related needs of the members. Computer user groups were one form of autonomous learning groups and the results of this study suggested that the role of such groups in adult learning may be far more important than was generally recognized by adult and community educators. en_US
dc.format.extent xii, 237 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Computers -- Study and teaching (Continuing education) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Technology -- Study and teaching (Continuing education) en_US
dc.title Grassroots computer education : a study of computer user groups and the model they provide for learning to cope with new technology en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/450961 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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