American missionaries in Iran, 1834-1934

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dc.contributor.advisor Huston, Robert S. en_US
dc.contributor.author Mansoori, Ahmad en_US
dc.coverage.spatial a-ir--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:28:31Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:28:31Z
dc.date.created 1986 en_US
dc.date.issued 1986
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1986 .M3 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/178006
dc.description.abstract American missionaries contributed significantly to the introduction into Iran of some elements of western culture, especially in the areas of education and medicine. The first of these missionaries went to Persia in 1832 to explore the possibility of establishing a base for the activities of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. The work of many others who succeeded him continued until 1934 when government imposed regulations drastically restricted the nature of their educational work in Iran.Between 1834 and 1870 Presbyterian missionaries labored to establish the foundations for a Christian church in Iran. They had to overcome numerous difficulties including grudging tolerance for their efforts by the Persian government. Their evangelical work was done mainly among Nestorian Christians in the northern part of Persia.The missionaries had some success and between 1870 Presbyterian missionaries labored to establish the foundations for a Christian church in Iran. They had to overcome numerous difficulties including grudging tolerance for their efforts by the Persian government. Their evangelical work was done mainly among Nestorian Christians in the northern part of Persia.The missionaries had some success and between 1870 and 1934 the area of their activity was expanded. Mission stations were opened in Tehran, Tabriz, Hamadan, Kermanshah, Kazvin, Resht, and Meshed.One of the most significant results of the missionary labors was the establishment of an impressive educational system from primary to college level in a nation that had no secular education. Eventually some of the graduates of the missionary schools became prominent in the Persian parliament. Others were among the leading Iranian lawyers, physicians, and engineers. The missionary schools afforded the first opportunity for the education of women in Persia by creating a school system that included Sage College for women in Tehran.The medical missionaries introduced modern medical practices to Iran. The first of these dedicated physicians arrived in Urumia in 1835. Gradually the number of medical missionaries increased and several hospitals were built. Dr. Joseph P. Cochran was the first missionary doctor to build a modern hospital in Persia and he established that nation's first modern medical school in Urumia. The first female physician in Persia, Miss Mary Bradford, was an American missionary.Although the missionaries were successful in educational and medical work they failed in their main objective, which was to evangelize not only Persia, but all of Asia. However, their schools, colleges and hospitals had contributed to the diffusion of western ideals and the en_US
dc.format.extent iv, 184 leaves : map ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Missions, American -- Iran. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Christians -- Iran. en_US
dc.title American missionaries in Iran, 1834-1934 en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/467363 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3090]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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