Perceptions and practices of nurse educators in recognizing and addressing student nurse stress

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Murk, Peter J., 1942- en_US
dc.contributor.author Marker, Jan Robey en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:28:33Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:28:33Z
dc.date.created 2001 en_US
dc.date.issued 2001
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 2001 .M37 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/178033
dc.description.abstract Three hundred and eight nurse educators, who teach in NLN Accredited Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs in the Midwest, were requested to complete a three-page survey concerning their perceptions and practices concerning student stress. The study demonstrated that nurse educators, in this study, were aware of the level of stress among students who were pursuing undergraduate degrees in nursing. The study found that most nurse educators understood that the sources of stress were a combination of the many roles and responsibilities of students. They were aware that most students needed services/interventions to assist them in coping with stress. Most nurse educators thought that they were responsible, to some degree, for intervening to assist students in decreasing their stress level. However, they expressed frustration at their attempts to help students. They indicated that many of the sources of stress were not within faculty control and that there was low participation when services/interventions were offered. Finally, the study found that most nurse educators thought that stress management for nursing students was included in the nursing curriculum. However, very little time was actually spent on stress management in the nursing program. Nurse educators indicated that they relied on other institutional services/interventions to provide stress management skills. However, many nurse educators indicated that they were willing to make changes to assist students. Nurse educators need to reconsider the amount of time that is spent facilitating students in reducing stress and helping them build coping skills that will continue to help them become competent nurses. Given the predicted nursing shortage that is estimated to last until 2020, the low application rate to nursing school, and the graying of America, it would seem prudent that nurse educators assist students who are in nursing programs become successful. The health of our nation may be at stake. The task for nurse educators is to help students recognize the signs of stress, understand the effects that unmanaged stress can produce, and teach the techniques that students can use in coping with stress. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Leadership
dc.format.extent x, 146, [8] leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing students -- Psychology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing students -- Job stress -- Public opinion. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nurse educators -- Attitudes. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Stress (Psychology) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Stress management. en_US
dc.title Perceptions and practices of nurse educators in recognizing and addressing student nurse stress en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1221275 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account