The effects of relaxation training and verbal suggestion phrases on auditory attention for high risk academic students

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dc.contributor.advisor Klem, John L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Nathan, Marilyn A. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:29:25Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:29:25Z
dc.date.created 1984 en_US
dc.date.issued 1984
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1984 .N38 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/179003
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of relaxation train and verbal suggestion phrases upon auditory attention of high risk academic students. The population consisted of one hundred eight freshmen entering the Ball State University Academic Opportunity Program.Subjects were randomly assigned to four treatment conditions. Condition one received relaxation training, condition two received relaxation training plus verbal suggestion phrases, condition three received verbal suggestion phrases, and condition four was the control condition. All subjects were post tested. Data were analyzed by a one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Scheffe test. Six null hypotheses were tested. The .05 level of significance was established as the critical probability level for non-acceptance of hypotheses.Findings1. Subjects who received relaxation training plus verbal suggestion phrases had higher auditory attention levels than those who received relaxation training only.2. Subjects who received verbal suggestion phrases only had higher levels of auditory attention than those who received relaxation training plus verbal suggestion phrases.3. Subjects who received relaxation training plus verbal sugtion phrases had higher levels of auditory attention than those in the control condition.4. Subjects who received verbal suggestion phrases only had higher levels of auditory attention than those who received relaxation training only.5. Subjects who received relaxation training only did not show any differences in levels of auditory attention from those in the control condition.6. Subjects who received verbal suggestion phrases only had higher levels of auditory attention than those in the control condition.ConclusionsThe findings of this study support the effectiveness of the use of verbal suggestion phrase5to enhance auditory attention. They do not support the contention of the large body of research that implies that relaxation training is the most effective method of enhancing auditory attention. Recommendations include the need for replication to further substantiate these findings. en_US
dc.format.extent v, 74 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Learning, Psychology of. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Learning -- Study and teaching. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Attention. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Relaxation. en_US
dc.title The effects of relaxation training and verbal suggestion phrases on auditory attention for high risk academic students en_US
dc.title.alternative Relaxation training and verbal suggestion phrases en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/225605 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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