American parents' and Taiwanese parents' perceptions of quality standards for early childhood programs

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Stroud, James C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Ni, Young-Chih en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- a-ch--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:29:29Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:29:29Z
dc.date.created 1995 en_US
dc.date.issued 1995
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1995 .N5 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/179076
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the perceptions of urban parents of two countries concerning standards of selected criteria of high quality standards of early childhood programs developed by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs (NAECP).Two hundred and forty nine parents ( U. S. = 129, Taiwan = 120) participated in the study. The effects of country, sex, and educational background were examined.The study was conducted by using the questionnaire survey. The instrument was constructed by the researcher based on the Accreditation Criteria and Procedures of the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs.A three-way.MANOVA on 10 dependent variables with independent factors of country, sex, and educational background was used to test Hypothesis I at the .05 level of significance. The Hypothesis I was rejected.To test Hypothesis II, a Spearman's Rho rank order correlation coefficient was computed using the mean ranks of the 10 criteria. Significance was examined at the .05 level. The Hypothesis II was accepted.These findings leading to the following conclusions:1. American and Taiwanese parents shared the similar perceptions that supported the quality standards developed by the NAECP. Most of the statistically differences that existed between American and Taiwanese parents were the differences of the degree of acceptance of the quality standards.2. The only criterion that caused parents' selections to lean toward negative responses was the staffing standards.3. Whenever there was a statistically significant difference between American and Taiwanese parents, the Taiwanese parents were always agreed more than the American parents.4. Regardless of factors of sex and educational background, both American and Taiwanese parents shared similar values in that they ranked health-and-safety and teacher-child interactions as the first or second important factors.5. Regardless of the factors of sex and educational background, both American and Taiwanese parents shared the same values in that they ranked administration and evaluations as the two least important factors when selecting an early childhood program for their children. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Elementary Education
dc.format.extent xiii, 193 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Early childhood education -- Public opinion -- Cross-cultural studies. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Day care centers -- Public opinion -- Cross-cultural studies. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Parents -- United States -- Attitudes. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Parents -- Taiwan -- Attitudes. en_US
dc.title American parents' and Taiwanese parents' perceptions of quality standards for early childhood programs en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1001184 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Doctoral Dissertations [3090]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account