The effects of graduated exercise at the piano on the pianist's cardiac output, forearm blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Koriath, Kirby Lawrence, 1941- en_US
dc.contributor.author Parr, Sharon M. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:29:47Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:29:47Z
dc.date.created 1985 en_US
dc.date.issued 1985
dc.identifier LD2489.Z62 1985 .P37 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/179423
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of graduated exercise at the piano on the pianist's cardiac output, forearm blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure. Also considered were the effects of piano practice conditioning, general cardiovascular conditioning, and acute cigarette smoking on the aforementioned parameters during and after graduated piano exercise. Fifteen adult pianists participated in the study. The piano exercises consisted of bilateral scales played in eight three-minute stages. Tempo was constant within stages but increased with each new stage. Cardiac output and forearm blood flow were monitored by electrical impedance utilizing a tetrapolar electrode-placement system. Cardiac output, forearm blood flow, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure generally increased proportionally to exercise intensity and returned to basal levels within a five-minute recovery period. Strenuous piano exercise stresses the body in general, not just the active forearm muscles. The stress load placed on the heart by piano playing can be at least as great as that produced by a brisk walk. Piano playing can generate an oxygen debt in the forearm muscles. Conditioning of forearm muscles through regular piano practice results in training effect for piano playing in those muscles. Pianists who participate regularly in quality aerobic exercise programs generally begin and end piano exercise with lower heart rates than those who do not exercise. Frequently, they increase heart rates to a lesser extent during exercise and settle into steady postexercise rates more quickly as well. Both regular piano practice and general cardiovascular conditioning gained through quality aerobic exercise contribute to increased piano-playing endurance.Acute smoking increases cardiac outputs and heart rates of pianists resulting in higher levels of cardiac work during piano exercise. During piano exercise, acutely smoking pianists require greatly increased forearm blood flows to meet muscle needs. en_US
dc.format.extent 2, xii, 202 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Piano -- Instruction and study -- Physiological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Piano -- Performance -- Physiological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Tobacco -- Physiological effect. en_US
dc.title The effects of graduated exercise at the piano on the pianist's cardiac output, forearm blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D.A.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/434086 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account