Can relational personality theory provide a framework for differences on Holland typology for women?

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dc.contributor.advisor Gridley, Betty E. en_US
dc.contributor.author Rees, Amy M. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:18Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:18Z
dc.date.created 1998 en_US
dc.date.issued 1998
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 1998 .R44 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/179984
dc.description.abstract This study used relational personality theory to explore gender differences in Holland typology. The primary premise of relational personality theory is that women have a self identity that is developed and maintained in relation to others. This orientation to relationship or Connected Self is a primary component of identity that will lead to decisions and actions that reflect the valuing of relationships. This is in opposition to a Separate Self orientation that is primarily centered in independence, separation, and autonomy. The Connected Self was hypothesized to effect women's career interests as measured by the Self-Directed Search (SDS). The strongest relationship was found between Connected Self and scores on the Social scale of the SDS. Connected Self was found to be a significant predictor variable for women's scores on the Social scale. Connected Self also predicted scores on the Artistic scale, although to a lesser degree. In addition, Separate Self was a significant predictor of scores on the Enterprising and Conventional scales of the SDS.In order to further explore the relationship between Connected Self and women's scores on the Social scale, the subjects scoring highest in Social were further divided into groups based on interests in working with peers versus clients and on ability to care for self and others or to put others needs before one's own. Counseling implications for women who score highest on the Social scale are offered. In addition, further research is suggested. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Psychology
dc.format.extent v, 78 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Women -- Employment. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Personality and occupation. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Women -- Psychology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Vocational interests. en_US
dc.title Can relational personality theory provide a framework for differences on Holland typology for women? en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1117098 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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