The relationships of selected demographic data to the attitudes of 1973 Taylor University freshmen

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dc.contributor.advisor Marconnit, George D. en_US
dc.contributor.author Rice, Carl W. (Carl Wallace), 1922- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:20Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:20Z
dc.date.created 1975 en_US
dc.date.issued 1975
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1975 .R52 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180015
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to determine if a significant relationship existed between selected demographic data and attitudes of freshmen entering Taylor University in the fall of 1973.The population of the study consisted of freshmen entering Taylor University in the fall of 1973.A review of related literature revealed that with unrest and dissatisfaction so prevalent on college campuses during the 1960's, researchers had turned to study of students. Studies were conducted relative to student attitudes, opinions and value structures.The instrument used in the study was a thirty-six item questionnaire developed after reviewing related literature and consulting with a committee of experts at Ball State University and Taylor University. Three hundred eighty-two from a total of three hundred ninety-one students returned completed questionnaires.Six null hypotheses were tested through use of the t test in an item analysis and by using the difference between uncorrelated proportions in a factor analysis. Both tests were used to determine whether a significant difference existed between student attitudes and selected demographic data.The following findings were based on analysis of data obtained from 382 questionnaires:1. One hundred eighty-six, 48.7 per cent, respondents were male.2. One hundred ninety-six, 51.3 per cent, respondents were female .3. Three hundred seventy-three, 97.6 per cent, respondents were caucasian.4. Nine, 2.4 per cent, respondents were from all races other than caucasian.5. Three hundred seventy-nine, 99.2 per cent, respondents were single.6. Three, 0.8 per cent, respondents were married or divorced.7. One hundred sixty-six, 43.5 per cent, respondents' fathers had a maximum of a high school education.8. Two hundred sixteen, 56.5 per cent, respondents! fathers had at least some college training.9. One hundred ninety-eight, 51.8 per cent, respondents had finished high school in the top quartile.10. One hundred eighty-four, 48.2 per cent, respondents had finished high school in the lower three quartiles.11. One hundred s~even,'28.0 per cent, respondents expressed no concern for financing a college education.12. Two hundred seventy-five, 72.0 per cent, respondents expressed concern for financing college.13. None of the null hypotheses of the study were rejected by determining the differences between uncorrelated proportions nor through use of the t test.The following conclusions resulted from testing the null hypotheses through use of uncorrelated proportions and the t test:1. There is no significant difference in the responses relating to attitudes held on entering college between the male and female members of the population.2. No conclusion could be made in determining if a significant difference existed in the responses relating to attitudes held on entering college between caucasian students and those of other races due to lack of sufficient data.3. No conclusion could be made in determining if a significant difference existed in the responses relating to attitudes held on entering college between single students and other students due to the lack of sufficient data.4. There was no significant difference in the responses relating to the attitude held on entering college as determined by the level of formal education of the father.5. There is no significant difference in the responses relating to the attitudes held on entering college as determined by high school rank. 6. There is no significant difference in the responses relating to the attitudes held on entering college relating to the level of concern for the ability to finance a college education. en_US
dc.format.extent vi, 92 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh College freshmen -- Statistics. en_US
dc.subject.other Taylor University (Upland, Ind.) en_US
dc.title The relationships of selected demographic data to the attitudes of 1973 Taylor University freshmen en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/415683 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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