Indiana high school biology teachers and evolutionary theory : acceptance and understanding

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dc.contributor.advisor Warden, Melissa A. en_US
dc.contributor.author Rutledge, Michael L. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-in en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:37Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:37Z
dc.date.created 1996 en_US
dc.date.issued 1996
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1996 .R88 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180357
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this dissertation was to explore the status of and relationships among the variables of teacher acceptance of evolutionary theory, teacher understanding of evolutionary theory, and teacher understanding of the nature of science among Indiana public high school biology teachers. The relationships between these variables and the emphasis evolution receives in the classroom and teacher academic variables were investigated. Teacher knowledge structure of the concept of evolution was also explored.To answer the questions and hypotheses delineated in the study, a 68-item questionnaire and concept mapping activity was administered to the population of 989 teachers. The response rate was 53%.The teachers exhibited only a moderate level of acceptance and a marginal level of understanding of evolutionary theory. Teacher understanding of the nature of science was moderately high. Evolution played only a minor role in the curriculum. While the teachers had completed considerable course work in biology, the vast majority lacked specific course work in evolution and the nature of science.The data revealed a significant relationship between teacher acceptance and teacher understanding of evolutionary theory and between teacher acceptance of evolutionary theory and teacher understanding of the nature of science. The data also revealed significant associations between teacher allocation of instructional time to evolution and teacher level of acceptance of evolutionary theory, teacher level of understanding of evolutionary theory, teacher level of understanding of the nature of science, and teacher completion of a course in evolution. Additionally, the data revealed significant associations between teacher level of understanding of evolutionary theory and teacher completion of a course in evolution and teacher academic background in biology. Significant associations were revealed between teacher level of acceptance of evolutionary theory and both teacher completion of a course in evolution and teacher completion of a course in the nature of science.A significant amount of the variance in teacher acceptance of evolutionary theory was explained by the other variables delineated. The concept mapping activity revealed that teacher acceptance and understanding of evolutionary theory was reflected in teacher knowledge structure of evolution and that teachers' knowledge structures were characterized by an unsophisticated organizational framework. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Biology
dc.format.extent viii, 199 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Evolution (Biology) -- Study and teaching (Secondary) -- Indiana. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Biology teachers -- Training of -- Indiana. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Biology -- Study and teaching (Secondary) -- Indiana. en_US
dc.title Indiana high school biology teachers and evolutionary theory : acceptance and understanding en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1027093 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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