The effect of a relationship-driven teaching style on the academic performance of at-risk ninth graders in the English content area classroom : a case study

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dc.contributor.advisor Stroud, James C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Schlichte, Jacqueline M. Perrine en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:47Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:47Z
dc.date.created 2005 en_US
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 2005 .S35 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180483
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine the nature of the response of ninth grade English students to a Relationship-driven Teaching Style. Explored was the effect of Relationship-driven Teaching Style on the academic and lived experiences of four ninth grade At-risk English students. Additionally, the study allowed room to study the nature of other areas of perceived growth that resulted from exposure to this affective style. This exploration was conducted in a rural junior/senior high school setting.Data collection employed: 1) Participant-observer field notes (researcher as primary instrument); 2) Reading, Writing, and Non-Verbal Behaviors as recorded on field notes by the participant-observer. (Inquiries were informal in nature, except for simplistic reading questionnaires); and 3) The Corporation made available archival records inclusive of a. NWEA (Northwest Evaluation Test Scores); and b. Corporation Pilot Study data from a reading study conducted the previous year. Students were observed a minimum of two times per week during the time-span allowed for this exploration.Use of the Constant/Comparative Method (Merriam, 1998; Yin, 2002) yielded the following thematic areas: 1) Self- efficacy; 2) Perceptions toward others and self; 3) Internal changes, such as attitudinal metamorphosis toward education; 4) Importance of family approval, 5) Personal responsibility and "trying;" 6) Mutual Respect; 7) Non-verbal and verbal communication; 8) Physical or emotional reactions; 9) Teacher Characteristics; and 10) Academic achievement (as connected to all other categories).Data were interpreted to discover impact of Relationship-driven Teaching on said students and effectiveness in light of instruments as well as lived experience in the home. It was found that three, of four participants, significantly enhanced achievement and personal affective responses to Relationship-driven Teaching Style. Small gains were made by the fourth student, attributed to lived experience. Relationship-driven Teaching Style was thought to be effective. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Elementary Education
dc.format.extent xiii, 216 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Teacher-student relationships -- Case studies. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Affective education -- Case studies. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Learning disabled teenagers -- Education -- Case studies. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading (Secondary) -- Case studies. en_US
dc.title The effect of a relationship-driven teaching style on the academic performance of at-risk ninth graders in the English content area classroom : a case study en_US
dc.title.alternative Effect of a relationship driven teaching style on the academic performance of at-risk ninth graders in the English content area classroom en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1312663 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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