The development and use of simulations for secondary school administration

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dc.contributor.advisor Lyon, Don O. en_US
dc.contributor.author Schrenker, Robert J. (Robert Joseph), 1935- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:49Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:49Z
dc.date.created 1970 en_US
dc.date.issued 1970
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1970 .S37 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180525
dc.description.abstract The major purpose of the study was to develop simulation materials uniquely designed for use in preparation programs for secondary school administrators in Indiana. The procedures used in the study included the following: (1) development of a conceptual framework for guiding the construction of simulation materials, (2) development of background materials describing the simulated school system, (3) development of selected administrative problems for use with the simulated school system, (4) development of a format and a procedural guide for use of the simulation materials in a class in secondary school administration, (5) use of the simulated materials and selected administrative problems in a pre-service secondary school administration class, (6) preparation of an evaluation instrument to secure student evaluations of simulation materials and techniques, (7) administration of the evaluation instrument, (8) analysis, tabulation, and presentation of the data obtained through administration of the evaluation instrument, (9) presentation of the findings, conclusions, and recommendations for further study, and (10) presentation of the simulation materials, decision analysis form, and questionnaire used in the study. Student evaluations pertained to the following aspects of student perceptions of the simulation materials and utilization procedures developed as a part of the study: (1) the "reality" of the simulation experiences, (2) the orientation value of the in-basket problems, (3) the value of the simulation materials for creating an understanding of the need for additional professional preparation, (4) the orientation value of the background materials, (5) the value of the simulation activities, (6) the relative value of simulation as a teaching technique, (7) the most-valued and the least-valued in-basket problems, (8) the adequacy of time allocations, (9) suggestions for improvement of the simulation materials and activities, (10) suggestions for additional uses of simulation materials, and (11) the most-liked and the most-disliked aspects of the simulation experiences. Conclusions were based upon the findings of the study, on the literature and research reviewed as a part of the study, and on the experiences of the writer in designing and testing the simulation materials developed as a part of the study. 1. The simulated in-basket problems have potential value for orienting pre-service secondary school administrators to current problems of practicing secondary school administrators in the State of Indiana. 2. The simulation materials have limited potential value for creating an understanding of the need for additional professional preparation prior to assuming the secondary school principalship. 3. Utilization of the background materials as reference sources for the in-basket problems has potential value for orienting students to the contents of legal, procedural, and regulatory reference materials commonly used by practicing secondary school administrators in Indiana. 4. Both pre-service and in-service educational administrators enthusiastically support the use of stimulation materials as an instructional device. Students using simulation materials readily become involved in simulation activities and do perceive such activities as being of considerable instructional value. 5. Educational administration students do perceive simulated administrative problems as representing authentic problems of practicing school administrators. 6. Individual and group problem-solving simulation activities do induce educational administration students to develop alternative strategies for problem solutions. 7. Simulation materials and utilization procedures representing authentic educational administration problems, which will be perceived as moderately realistic administrative experiences by students using such materials, can be inexpensively developed and tested. Recommendations for further study were based upon the findings of the study, upon the literature and research reviewed as a part of the study, and upon the experiences of the writer in designing and testing the simulation materials. 1. The simulation materials developed as a part of the study should be used with other pre-service secondary school administration students in other institutions of higher learning in Indiana for the purpose of validating or rejecting the findings of the study. 2. Studies should be initiated for the purpose of comparing performance of simulated administrative tasks with on-the-job administrative performance. 3. The feasibility of presenting the simulated administrative problems developed as a part of the study through media other than the in-basket medium should be investigated. en_US
dc.format.extent v, 256 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Simulation methods. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh High schools -- Administration. en_US
dc.title The development and use of simulations for secondary school administration en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/416085 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3090]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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