It is organic and it matters : social interaction and the writing development of African American children

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dc.contributor.advisor Martin, Linda E. en_US
dc.contributor.author Scott, Robin E. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:30:55Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:30:55Z
dc.date.created 2008 en_US
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier LD2489.Z68 2008 .S29 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180594
dc.description.abstract The multi-case study examined the role that social interaction plays in the writing development of fourth grade African American students in three different classrooms in a large Midwestern city. The study explored the nature of the students' interactions and the points during the writing process where interactions occurred. Also under investigation was how teachers facilitated the interactions within their classrooms. Each classroom was considered a case and cases within each case were then selected to allow for a more in-depth examination of the nature of students' conversations. Data collected included observations, student interviews, and artifacts. Information gathered from the study was analyzed using a constant comparative approach. Themes that emerged were compared across cases.Analysis of the data showed that there were many purpose for the interactions in which the African American students engaged. The interactions: (1) enabled students to get assistance from peers and teachers, (2) provided students with encouragement, (3) motivated students as writers, and (4) fostered a deeper understanding of writing. The data also showed that students engaged in verbal and nonverbal interactions at various points in the writing process with peers, teacher, and even themselves. While the teachers varied in their approaches to facilitating the interactions, even when they did not intentionally create opportunities for interactions, the students engaged with one another anyway. Based on the results of the study, teachers should consider affording African American students the opportunity to regularly interact with their peers during writing time, providing an audience that extends beyond the classroom teacher. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Elementary Education
dc.format.extent 135, [12] leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh African American school children -- Social conditions -- Case studies. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh English language -- Composition and exercises -- Case studies. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh African American school children -- Education (Elementary) -- Case studies. en_US
dc.title It is organic and it matters : social interaction and the writing development of African American children en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1395589 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3134]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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