An analysis of procedures used to evaluate administrators in larger member schools of the Association of Christian Schools International

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dc.contributor.advisor Kowalski, Theodore J. en_US
dc.contributor.author Simmons, Brian S. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:08Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:08Z
dc.date.created 1996 en_US
dc.date.issued 1996
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1996 .S46 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180792
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate administrators' perceptions of their evaluations by school boards in larger Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) schools. Critical questions about the evaluation practices of ACSI schools were addressed. Through the use of survey methodology, 282 administrators in ACSI schools of over 400 students were asked to respond to 19 questions. The first question asked whether or not the administrator had been evaluated. The next two questions pertained to written policies and practices that define the administrator's evaluation. The remaining questions explored the nature and extent of evaluations that had been conducted. Answers to these questions provide information crucial to developing more effective practices for ACSI school board members to follow in the evaluation of chief administrators.This study produced seven major findings:1) Most larger ACSI schools (91.4%) had written job descriptions for the chief administrator.2) Most larger ACSI schools (60.2%) did not have a formal policy for evaluating the chief administrator.3) Most existing policies (67%) did not specify a procedure to be followed for evaluating a chief administrator.4) Most chief administrators in larger ACSI schools (61.3%) had been evaluated by their school boards.5) Most administrators (56.9%) reported that their evaluations were informal.6) Geographic location did not appear to have an effect on practices used for evaluating chief administrators.7) The chief administrator's length of time in the current position did not appear to have an effect on practices used for evaluating chief administrators.In general, results suggested a dissatisfaction with the present state of evaluation. ACSI schools were less likely than public schools to have formal policies in place to govern board evaluation of a chief administrator. Finally, ACSI school boards were less likely than public school boards to evaluate their chief administrators.Three recommendations evolved from this study:1) Further research needs to be conducted concerning administrator and board evaluation in larger ACSI schools.2) ACSI could play a key role in helping member schools improve in the area of board evaluation of the chief school administrator.3) Larger ACSI schools need to improve policy and practice in the area of administrator evaluation. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Educational Leadership
dc.format.extent ix, 107 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Church schools -- Administration. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh School administrators -- Rating of. en_US
dc.subject.other Association of Christian Schools International. en_US
dc.title An analysis of procedures used to evaluate administrators in larger member schools of the Association of Christian Schools International en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1027088 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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