An investigation into the relationships between teaching strategies of high school biology teachers, student Myers-Briggs psychological type, the development of science-related attitudes, and science-related career choices

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dc.contributor.advisor Johnson, Susan M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Sipe, Betty Burns en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:10Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:10Z
dc.date.created 1988 en_US
dc.date.issued 1988
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1988 .S56 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180821
dc.description.abstract Research demonstrates correlations between the sensing-intuitive dimension of psychological type as interpreted by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) (Myers 1985) and science-related career choices. Alarming decreases in science-related career interests prompted this study which employed psychological type theory to investigate relationships between teaching strategies preferences of Indiana high school biology teachers and science-related attitudes of their academically-talented students. The purpose was to learn if good biology teachers instill positive attitudes within the context of the sensing-intuitive dimension by adapting teaching strategies to match the psychological type composition of their classes and therefore inspire students to pursue science-related careers. Teacher and student psychological type was determined by the MBTI. Teaching style preferences of 20 exemplary teachers and 16 randomly-selected teachers related to their 722 academically-talented students were explored by the Biology Teaching Strategies Inventory developed by the researcher. This instrument contained 40 forced-choice items with paired sensing and intuitive activities written to reflect sound biological conceptual themes from BSCS recommendations. An ANOVA determined that neither teacher group appeared to be adapting teaching strategies. Both teacher groups preferred teaching strategies corresponding to their own psychological type, sensing or intuitive, even when they were to select strategies to use with their specific classes.Science-related attitudes of 338 academically-talented students of 10 exemplary and 16 randomly-selected teachers were examined by seven scales of the Test of Science-related Attitudes (TOSRA) (Barry Fraser 1981). A covariant analysis of student science-related attitudes coupled with student variables of Psychological type (sensing and intuitive), career choice, gender, and socio-economic level indicated statistically significant differences in attitude scores of students of both teacher groups: females of exemplary teachers scored almost as high as males of both teacher groups on enjoyment of science learning and science leisure interests, sensing males of higher socio-economic levels had very low attitudes on adoption of scientific attitudes, females of both teacher groups had more positive attitudes than males on normality of scientists, students of exemplary teachers choosing biology-related careers had lower scores than students with similar career choices of randomly-selected teachers. Intuitive students had more positive attitudes than sensing students on all TOSRA scales. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Biology
dc.format.extent x, 218 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Biology -- Study and teaching (Secondary) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh High school students -- Psychology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Vocational interests -- Testing. en_US
dc.title An investigation into the relationships between teaching strategies of high school biology teachers, student Myers-Briggs psychological type, the development of science-related attitudes, and science-related career choices en_US
dc.title.alternative Teaching strategies of high school biology teachers. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/720288 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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