Scheduled teacher preparation time as perceived by superintendents, principals, and teachers in secondary schools accredited by North Central Association

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Nesper, Paul W. en_US
dc.contributor.author Sparks, Patricia May en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:21Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:21Z
dc.date.created 1980 en_US
dc.date.issued 1980
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1980 .S72 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/180992
dc.description.abstract The purposes of the study were: (1) to examine the perceptions superintendents, principals, and teachers have relative to the utilization of scheduled preparation time; (2) to determine if teachers with more experience had a different perception of the utilization of scheduled teacher preparation time than less experienced teachers; (3) to determine if teachers had a preference when the preparation was scheduled; and (4) to determine if the use of preparation time for people interaction, preparation and planning tasks, administrative tasks, personal and co-educational tasks were perceived in the same way by superintendents, principals, and teachers.The preparation period is one of the standards used by the North Central Association for secondary school accreditation. The preparation period was recognized as a part of the teaching -load, was strongly recommended for each teacher, wan included in each teacher's schedule, and had to be included within the six-hour day.In order to compare perceptions of superintendents, principals, and teachers relative to utilization of preparation period, a questionnaire was developed for the study. In final form, the questionnaire was comprised of 34 items. Demographic data were also obtained from each group of respondents. A total of 1227 questionnaires was mailed. There were 975 usable questionnaires returned.The population comprised 50 Indiana secondary schools accredited by the North Central Association; the superintendents of each school corporation in which the 50 schools were located; the principals of each of the 50 schools; and 40 per cent of the teachers selected at random from each school. The 50 schools, located in 42 school corporations, were randomly selected from the official NCA roster of accredited secondary schools.The hypotheses for the study were stated in null form to facilitate testing and statistical treatment. For each population sample (superintendents, principals, and teachers) an absolute frequency was computed for questionnaire responses. Utilizing the absolute frequency, the median test and relative frequency was computed. The chisquare test was used to determine the level of significance. The hypotheses were rejected above the .05 level of significance. Each hypothesis had five sub-parts. The acceptance or nonacceptance of the hypotheses was determined by the statistical significance of three of the five subparts.The study indicated most secondary teachers have assigned preparation time. From the 892 teacher questionnaires, two teachers indicated they did not have a preparation period. It can be concluded that guidelines have been established for teacher scheduled preparation time within the school day.To meet the needs of students, scheduled teacher preparation time should be within the school day. A vast majority of teachers utilized preparation time for students to make up tests, for students enrolled in independent study, and for student conferences. This requires the student to be in attendance and if all preparation time was before or after school, student attendance would be more difficult to attain.The data revealed a considerable range in the perceptions of superintendents, principals, and teachers in the utilization of preparation time for instructional and non-instructional responsibilities, but it can be concluded tasks related to students and instructional procedures were utilized the most often.Hall monitoring, lunch room supervision, extra curricular activities, and publications do not utilize a significant portion of teacher preparation time. Superintendents and school boards have provided for teacher preparation time free from monitoring non-instructional activities. en_US
dc.format.extent 3, x, 157 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Lesson planning. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Education, Secondary -- Research. en_US
dc.title Scheduled teacher preparation time as perceived by superintendents, principals, and teachers in secondary schools accredited by North Central Association en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/264510 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Doctoral Dissertations [3134]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account