Social class color preferences and application by clothing retailers in segmenting their markets

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dc.contributor.author Gavin, John C. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:31:23Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:31:23Z
dc.date.created 1982 en_US
dc.date.issued 1982
dc.identifier LD2489.Z9 1982 .G38 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181010
dc.description.abstract This study investigates the differences in color preference among the upper middle, lower middle and upper lower social classes, categorized by Warner's three-variable Index of Status Characteristics, and addresses the use of color preference as a segmentation tool by clothing retailers. The administration of the questionnaire consisted of asking respondents to do the following: (1) pick one of three shades from each of the seven wall colors and each of the six carpet colors that they would like to see used in a clothing store where they shop (in addition, for carpeting, the respondents were asked to pick from among four naps the one which they would prefer to see used for the carpeting in a clothing store where they shop), (2) decide if, of the wall and carpet shades that they chose, there were -any they would not like to see used in a clothing store where they shop, (3) rank each of the wall and carpet shades that they did want to see used in a clothing store where they shop, (4) rate each of the wall and carpet shades that they would like to see used in a clothing store where they shop, (5) estimate the impact that wall and carpet colors have on their shopping mood, (6) pair their most preferred wall shade with each of the carpet shades that they would like to see most preferred carpet shade with they said they would like to see each of the wall shades used in a clothing store used in a clothing store where they shop and then rank the pairings in the order of their preference, (7) pair their where they shop and then rank the pairings in the order of their preference, and (8) estimate how sensitive they are to colors. Cross-tabulations of variables by social class were analyzed using correlation analysis and chi square. The results obtained suggest to clothing retailers several marketing-related issues which must be considered. Of primary interest are the differences in color shade preference among the social classes and how these differences can affect a clothing retailer's ability to attract particular social classes. en_US
dc.format.extent iv, 117 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Color in interior decoration. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Marketing research. en_US
dc.title Social class color preferences and application by clothing retailers in segmenting their markets en_US
dc.type Research paper (M.B.A.), 4 hrs. en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.B.A.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/222641 en_US


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  • Research Papers [4992]
    Research papers submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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