Evaluations by teacher educators of observable behavior characteristics used to predict creative teaching potential of elementary education student teachers

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dc.contributor.advisor Mauth, Leslie J. en_US
dc.contributor.author Weltner, William Harold, 1923- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:32:20Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:32:20Z
dc.date.created 1969 en_US
dc.date.issued 1969
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 1969 .W45 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181849
dc.description.abstract Objectives of research done in this study were to determine statistical relationships between the degree of creative teaching potential attributed to student teachers in an elementary education program by teacher educators on a single-item Ratinq Instrument used to express their final evaluative judgment of total student teaching behavior and (1) a multiple-item Rating Schedule for evaluating creative teaching potential, at an intermediate point in the student teaching term, and (2) student's raw scores on a standardized test of general creativity, the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking. The sample population for this study was the total enrollment of the elementary education majors at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, who were doing their student teaching during the Spring Quarter, 1968. Three means or instruments were employed to gather data used in this investigation.(a) The Torrance Test of Creative Thinking, Fiqural Form A was administered to one hundred thirty elementary education student teachers at the beginning of the Spring Quarter. The TTCT measured the general creativity potential of the sample population. The raw scores were dependent variables in the statistical analysis of data for this study. (b) The Student Teacher Behavior Rating Schedule was developed for the purpose of determining which behavior characteristics, when evaluated by teacher educators at an intermediate point in the student teaching term, were significant indicators of final, over-all ratings of creative teaching potential at the end of the term. The evaluations were translated into data that became dependent variables in the statistical analysis. (c) The single-item Rating Instrument was developed to designate the degree of creative teaching potential displayed by students during their total student teaching experience as determined by supervising teachers. Data derived from this Instrument became independent variables in the statistical analysis of data for this research study. Data collected from the administration of the TTCT, the Rating Schedule, and the Ratinq Instrument were analyzed by the IBM 1620 Computer by using the single correlation and the multiple linear regression programs. Computations provided correlation coefficients, multiple correlation coefficients, F-values, and beta values associated with the best combinations of independent variables in the multiple linear regression equation for predicting each of the criterion variables in the hypotheses. The F statistic and the t-scores were used to test the significance of each of the predictive models. The statistical analysis identified items on the Student Teacher Behavior Rating Schedule which, when used by teacher educators, were able to distinguish students in Set A and B (combined) from the others in the sample population, when Set A consisted of students who were rated as possessing high creative teaching potential by both the classroom critic teachers and the faculty supervising teacher on the single-item Rating Instrument used at the close of the student teaching experience, and when Set B was made up of students who were rated as possessing low creative teaching potential by the same procedure.Results obtained from application of the multiple-item Rating Schedule during the student teaching term were used to identify items that showed agreement at a statistically significant level between evaluations of creative teaching potential made by classroom critic teachers and faculty supervising teachers. Scales, consisting of items usable by each of the two groups of supervising teachers and by combined groups of supervisors for evaluating creative teaching potential in student teachers were identified.The statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant relationship between scores on the TTCT and its measure of general creativity and evaluations by teacher educators of creative teaching potential of student teachers on the single-item Rating Instrument. Statistical analyses supported rejection of each of the null hypotheses formulated to structure research on the first major question posed. It was concluded that there is a statistically significant relationship between the degree of creative teaching potential attributed to student teachers on an elementary education program by teacher educators in their final, over-all evaluative judgment of total student teaching behavior and ratings given the same students by these same teacher educators earlier in the student teaching term on a multiple-item instrument.Additional statistical analyses supported acceptance of the null hypotheses formulated to structure research on the second major question posed. It was concluded that there is not a statistically significant relationship between the degree of creative teaching potential attributed to student teachers on an elementary education program by teacher educators in their final evaluative judgment of total student teaching behavior, and the students' raw scores, either totally and/or in part, on a standardized test of general creativity, the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking. en_US
dc.format.extent vii, 120 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Prediction of teacher success. en_US
dc.title Evaluations by teacher educators of observable behavior characteristics used to predict creative teaching potential of elementary education student teachers en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/418523 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3090]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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