From dying to living : a healing garden in the HIV/AIDS home environment facilitating healing and well-being

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dc.contributor.advisor Spangler, Ronald L.
dc.contributor.author Ellerbrook, SuLin K. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:32:24Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:32:24Z
dc.date.created 2002 en_US
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier LD2489.Z53 2002 .E44 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181906
dc.description.abstract HIV (Human immunodeficiency virus), transferable through blood, semen, or other bodily fluids, attacks the body's immune system. Months to years after a person is infected with HIV, this virus destroys the T-cells. When the T-cells are destroyed, the immune system can no longer defend the body against diseases and cancers (Yourhealth, 2002). Stress enables HIV to spread more quickly in infected persons and prevents antiretroviral drugs from restoring immune system function (Vasquez, 1999). When the body's T-cells drop below a certain count, a person is considered to have the severe immunological disorder, AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) (Dictionary.com, 2001).There is no known cure for AIDS (Yourhealth, 2002). Nearly 10,000 Hoosiers had been diagnosed with HIV/AIDS through December 2000 (Aidswalkindianapolis, 2002). Of the people living with HIV/AIDS in Indianapolis, 73% are between the ages of20-39, too young an age for people to be diagnosed with a fatal disease.This master plan was created for HIV/AIDS clients of Open Door Community HIV Services of Muncie, Indiana to meet some of their physical, emotional, and psychological needs. The design began with a vision for a setting in which HIV/AIDS clients' overall wellbeing could be promoted through relief from physical symptoms, stress reduction, and improvement in the overall sense of well-being (increased level of functioning) in a healing garden.The design solution led to the creation Of a series of healing garden spaces for HIV/AIDS clients in a home environment that, through the design, land, and plants, were aesthetically pleasing but also beneficial to health. In this home environment, the clients might find relief from physical symptoms, stress reduction, and improvement in their overall sense of well-being.
dc.description.sponsorship College of Architecture and Planning
dc.format.extent 74 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Landscape architecture. en_US
dc.title From dying to living : a healing garden in the HIV/AIDS home environment facilitating healing and well-being en_US
dc.type Undergraduate 5th year College of Architecture and Planning thesis.
dc.description.notes "LA 404 Comprehensive Project."
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.L.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1259428 en_US


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