An examination of American reading textbooks, 1785-1819, as an expression of eighteenth-century rhetorical theory, and as a precursor to nineteenth-century writing instruction

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Hanson, Linda K. en_US
dc.contributor.author Wilken, Curtis B. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:32:29Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:32:29Z
dc.date.created 2003 en_US
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier LD2489.Z64 2003 .W55 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/181975
dc.description.abstract In this study I examine twenty-five reading textbooks published in America between 1785 and 1819 for their rhetorical theory, pedagogy, and approach to language in order to discover more about the origins of modern writing instruction. The reading textbooks were selected for popularity, needing to go through at least three editions. I also examine four early writing textbooks, all published 1816 and earlier, and compare them to the reading textbooks on the same points.My results show that the dominant rhetorical theorist before 1800 is James Burgh, and not Hugh Blair. After 1800, rhetorical theory in these textbooks is dominated by Blair and John Walker. An emphasis on grammatical correctness is inherent in both writing and speech instruction, meaning the public associated grammatical correctness with writing instruction even in the eighteenth century. Correctness went beyond grammar into vocabulary and pronunciation because language instruction was primarily a matter of imitating the upper class. The reading textbooks, designed for teaching speech, show no evidence of the transition to writing instruction that occurred in the nineteenth century. My examination of the writing textbooks shows that writing instruction developed separately from speech instruction because the elocutionary pedagogy dominant in these years could not be applied to writing instruction. The early writing textbooks have the same emphasis on grammatical correctness, and add inventional schemata that are wholly absent from the reading textbooks. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Department of English
dc.format.extent vi, 227 leaves : facsims. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading -- Research. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading, Psychology of. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading -- Textbooks. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Rhetoric -- Study and teaching. en_US
dc.title An examination of American reading textbooks, 1785-1819, as an expression of eighteenth-century rhetorical theory, and as a precursor to nineteenth-century writing instruction en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (D. Ed.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1259307 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Doctoral Dissertations [3121]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account