One world, one architecture : universal human factors in design

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dc.contributor.advisor Fisher, Robert A.
dc.contributor.author Brueggert, Daniel S. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:33:32Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:33:32Z
dc.date.created 2001 en_US
dc.date.issued 2001
dc.identifier LD2489.Z52 2001 .B78 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/182763
dc.description.abstract This will be an exploration of the idea that there are universal and formulaic rules that can be used as an approach to design, regardless of geographical context. The aim is at constructing some 'calculus' for design: discrete steps and variables, that when combined, will be a design process.Connection to "place", in the conventional sense of the term, will be denied. This is an attempt at a formulation of some specific rules for successful 'object-oriented design'. In that regard, this project has a focus that is inclined towards industrial design. Some of what I attempt to do has a great amount of precedent in vehicular industries: the automotive, the yacht, and the aircraft industries all have produced interiors complementary to the human occupant. Many of the precedents I refer to are indeed solutions to architectural problems, elegant, yet confined within a machine. In these examples attention is paid, out of foresight or out of necessity, to the needs of occupants in small spaces. Comforting pyschological factors such as embracuring, centering (identification of a horizon, real or artificial), and sheltering, have impacted the development of such machined spaces, and are spatial sensibilities that exhibit a surprising degree of universal consensus.Tectonic and poetic development of these occupant-containers engenders them with meaning far beyond the status granted to mere 'machines', especially in the case of the interiors of everyday vehicles. A tangential question will certainly arise in this project, and that is the line of demarcation between 'architecture' and 'vehicle', or 'architecture' and 'machine'.This position will be tested on a mobile paleontological research prototype, ultimately one that can be mass-produced. Mobile, to explore the issues involved with inherent placelessness, and mass-produced, to explore the issues involved with formulaic design solutions. A further richness emerges with the ability to explore a 'human' space inside a machine. Embedded in this is a question: how to prevent alienation and discomfort as a reliance on technology increases? Can attention to ergonomics and the human scale solve this problem? (Greenberg) Can a variety of universal factors be found which allow design to become globally successful?Journalist Leslie Stahl described the twentieth century as one in which the world is "increasingly becoming one place." Vernacular solutions rely on the specifics of unique places: those specific situations still exist, yet the emergence of 'global culture' is a phenomenon that calls for a new design approach, that of the universal solution. Shin Takamatsu writes:"l do not put much value in the character of place, that is, its meaning in a given context. Archit$cture is concerned with the introduction of a new force that is unrelated to the character or uniqueness of place. In other words, a place is defined each time by architecture. "The position to be explored is not that 'the vernacular ought not be practiced', but rather that a universal formula design is possible. Competing visions and architectures can and will arise, but perhaps there will be several strains of universalism, all attempting to capture market share. Not that each strategy contradicts its competitors claim to being universal, but while all may be universally successful, one among others may emerge as the most universally successful. In an age when cultural values and trends are harder and harder to predict, perhaps a universal approach to form can be devised, and perhaps basic ergonomic attention is the best way to personalize mass-produced design.Thesis Topic: Issues and PositionsThis will be an exploration of the idea that there are universal and formulaic rules that can be used as an approach to design, regardless of geographical context. The aim is at constructing some 'calculus' for design: discrete steps and variables, that when combined, will be a design process. Connection to "place", in the conventional sense of the term, will be denied. This is an attempt at a formulation of some specific rules for successful'object-oriented design'. In that regard, this project has a focus that is inclined towards industrial design.Universal Human Factors will be sought, which when diligently applied, can support the design process. For this project, two categories of Factors will be explored:physical-ergonomics-the body is our interface to every design, andperceptual-aesthetics-human aesthetic sensibilities exhibit a surprising degree of similarity despite diverse cultures and ethics. (gestalt, color studies, etc)(There are, of course, others, but these two will be the focus of the project.) Aspects of human experience which fall somewhere between ergonomics and aesthetics will be considered. I refer here to psychological reactions to forms and spaces, reactions which may take root in physical (bodily) realities, or perceptual (visual) notions.In the consideration of Universal visual factors, two fields of work are immediately applicable: Gestalt theory, and the methods of industrial designers. Gestalt theorists researched some patterns in human reactions to images and forms, patterns that appear to have equal standing despite differences in culture, age, or gender. (Anthropologist Paul Kay's research shows, for example, that all cultures divide the color spectrum into the same 12 basic colors. (Edgerton) Identified characteristics of visual appeal include: rhythm, symmetry, continuity, and geometrizing. Much of this Gestalt research will be utilized to seek out potential rules for my formula. Industrial designers too have done a great deal of work in articulating and qualifying human responses to forms, to the point of breaking down formal expressions into three main categories: 0, F, and C values.O(rder): "aesthetic values that express the visual order of forms, their simplicity and clarity", ex: the repetition of similar shaped buttons on a telephone, the rounded encapsulation of current computer hardware.F(unction): "aesthetic values conducive to purposefulness, functionality, communicativeness, or the intention for which the products are made", ex: the widening of a table's base to suggest stability, the sleeking of a sports car to suggest speed/motion even... a mobile platform or prototype, ultimately one that can be mass-produced. Mobile, to explore the issues involved with inherent placelessness, and mass-produced, to explore the issues involved with formulaic design solutions. A further richness emerges with the ability to explore a `human' space inside a machine. Embedded in this is a question: how to prevent alienation and discomfort as a reliance on technology increases? Can attention to ergonomics and the human scale solve this problem?
dc.description.sponsorship College of Architecture and Planning
dc.format.extent 39 leaves : ill. ; 22 x 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Architecture. en_US
dc.title One world, one architecture : universal human factors in design en_US
dc.type Undergraduate 5th year College of Architecture and Planning thesis.
dc.description.degree Thesis (B. Arch.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1259663 en_US


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