The effect of progressive resistance strength training exercise on serum growth hormone and testosterone in young and elderly men

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dc.contributor.advisor Craig, Bruce W. en_US
dc.contributor.author Brown, Robert G. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:34:33Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:34:33Z
dc.date.created 1987 en_US
dc.date.issued 1987
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1987 .B76 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/183461
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to observe the response of serum hormones to a progressive resistance strength training program. Basal levels of serum growth hormone and total testosterone were measured before and after a 12-week strength training program in 8 young men (mean age= 23 years) and 13 elderly men (mean age= 63 years). The response of growth hormone and testosterone to an acute bout of strength training exercise was also measured. Changes in lean body mass, percent fat, fat weight, VO2max and girth measurements were determined.Sessions were started with walking and static stretching exercises for the major muscle groups. This was followed by 45-60 minutes of isotonic strength training exercise which consisted of the leg-press, leg-extension, leg-curl, torso extension, bench-press, pull-down, pull-over, horizontal arm adduction, arm adduction, and modified sit-ups on an abdominal platform. Subjects were told to increase weight at a station when they could successfully complete three sets of ten repetitions at that station. At weeks 2 and 12 of the study subjects were strength tested at the leg-press, leg-extension, and bench-press stations. Strength was measured as the most weight that could be lifted for six repetitions. Blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein pre and post training, and before, immediately following and 15 minutes after an exercise session.There was a significant increase (p <0.001) in strength for both groups for the leg press, leg extention and bench press. However, the young group was significantly stronger (p <0.001) than the elderly group in both pre and post test for all muscles measured. There was a significant increase (p <0.01) in lean weight in the elderly group which was correlated with increased strength on the leg press, leg extension and bench press on the post test. There was a significant increase (p <0.05) in growth hormone for both groups in response to an acute bout of exercise on both the pre and post test with the rise being significantly higher (p <0.025) in the young group. The increased strength in the young group correlated positively with increased serum growth hormone following an acute bout of exercise on the post test. There was no significant change in serum testosterone in response to an acute bout of exercise in either group. Basal levels of growth hormone and testosterone did not change.
dc.format.extent v, 54 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Exercise -- Physiological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Aging. en_US
dc.title The effect of progressive resistance strength training exercise on serum growth hormone and testosterone in young and elderly men en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/494560 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5318]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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