Influence of diet on biomass production of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris in laboratory culture

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Brown, Hugh J. (Hugh Joseph) en_US
dc.contributor.author Knorr, David B. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:36:12Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:36:12Z
dc.date.created 1992 en_US
dc.date.issued 1992
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1992 .K6 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184557
dc.description.abstract In a 28-day dietary study, Lumbricus terrestris were placed in one quart containers with soil and offered either corn (Zea mays L.), soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) or alfalfa (Medicago sativa) leaves, corn leaves treated with a 1:1 solution of 28% N fertilizer and deionized water, corn or soybean stalks, or no addition. The worms were weighed initially and after 28 days to determine biomass production, which was used for determining food quality. Worms exhibited large weight gains when fed alfalfa or soybean leaves, intermediate weight gains when fed corn leaves treated with N, and little or no gains for the remainder of treatments. N content of the tissues was positively correlated to biomass production. These results support the hypothesis that earthworm growth is determined by food quality, particularly N content.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Natural Resources
dc.format.extent ii, 42 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Earthworms -- Nutrition -- Requirements. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Earthworms -- Feeding and feeds. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nitrogen in animal nutrition. en_US
dc.title Influence of diet on biomass production of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris in laboratory culture en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/845951 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Master's Theses [5318]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account