The relationship between patient perceptions of informed consent and recall of information received during the informed consent process

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Ryan, Marilyn E. en_US
dc.contributor.author Walker, Nancy L. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:36:14Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:36:14Z
dc.date.created 1993 en_US
dc.date.issued 1993
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1993 .W35 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184592
dc.description.abstract Informed consent is a requirement by law. Informed consent is a two part process: giving the patient sufficient information so that an educated choice can be made and obtaining assent in writing (Coy, 1989; Fiesta 1991; Sweeney, 1991;). The purpose of this study is to determine the ability to recall information and the perception of patients about the process of receiving information after signing a consent to participate in a large research trial. Patients signing consents for participation in the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial were asked to complete the surveys. Thirty three patients were asked to complete the questionnaires. Twenty - four (72%) of the respondents returned the completed questionnaires. Confidentiality will be maintained since no names or identifying markers will be used.A modified Patient Recall Survey (Casselith, Zupkis, Sutton - Smith, & March, 1980) and a modified Consent Form Survey (Casselith et al, 1980) were used. The significance of the study is that the results will assist in improving the type of information given to patients and how that information is provided. By increasing patients awareness about the need for and rights of giving informed consent patients will be more knowledgeable health care consumers. Imogene King(1981) provides the theoretical framework for this study using the concept of perceptions as the basis.The first research question illustrated that the majority of the respondents were able to recall at least three risks or complications of participation in the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial. The second research question revealed eighty - seven percent of the patients agreed that informed consents are necessary. However, 27.8 % of the respondents perceived the informed consent as a legal document to protect the physician rights, while only 19.6 % felt that the consent represented a legal document to protect patient rights. Eighty three percent of the respondents understood that a consent did not have to be signed. However, responses to a second question revealed only 21.3 % understood that the informed consent was a chance to refuse or change treatment. Results to research question 3 illustrated that patients felt that informed consents are necessary. Finally, 79.2 % of patients reported that nurses provided the majority of informed consent information. When patients are able to understand and participate in health care decisions, patients will feel more control in determining outcomes.
dc.description.sponsorship School of Nursing
dc.format.extent viii, 76 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Informed consent (Medical law) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Patient education. en_US
dc.title The relationship between patient perceptions of informed consent and recall of information received during the informed consent process en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/865959 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Master's Theses [5318]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account