The effects of the Skyflex on vertical jump height and speed

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dc.contributor.advisor Gehlsen, Gale M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Waggener, Wesley R. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:37:59Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:37:59Z
dc.date.created 1997 en_US
dc.date.issued 1997
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1997 .W34 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/185986
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to determine the affect of SkyFlex training would have on jumping ability. The SkyFlex is a shoe constructed with a forefoot platform elevating the heel. The design purports enhancement of the stretch reflex in the Gastrocnemius and Soleus muscles. The SkyFlex includes an Airlon Flexfit sock liner designed to keep the ankle warm during training, minimizing tightness and flexibility reductions. Division I varsity male volleyball players (n= 17) were tested for the following: standing vertical jump, approach jump, court sprint, shuttle run, and anthropometry. Two-way AN OVA found no statistical significance (p<0.05) on any of the variables except for the differences between sessions of reaction forces. SkyFlex test group Ankle flexibility decreased with dorsiflexion while the control group increased both dorsal and plantar flexion. Based on the results of this study, training in the SkyFlex does not provide training advantages over training in a regular athletic shoe.
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education
dc.format.extent v, 64 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Athletic shoes -- Testing. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Athletic shoes -- Evaluation. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Jumping -- Physiological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Human mechanics. en_US
dc.title The effects of the Skyflex on vertical jump height and speed en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1041904 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5318]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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