Age and muscle function : impact of aerobic exercise

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dc.contributor.advisor Harber, Matthew P. en_US
dc.contributor.author Douglass, Matthew D. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:41:49Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:41:49Z
dc.date.created 2008 en_US
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 2008 .D68 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/188494
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this investigation was to comprehensively examine the influence of progressive aerobic exercise training on whole muscle size and function in older women (65-80 yr). Three sedentary, healthy, females (66±1 yrs, 167±2 cm, 70±7 kg) performed 12 weeks of supervised progressive cycle training (42 training sessions 3-4 sessions/week up to 80% HRR). Subjects were tested before and after training for maximum aerobic capacity (VO2max), quadriceps cross sectional area (CSA), whole muscle specific tension, concentric 1-RM, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and concentric peak power (wafts). On average, the three subjects improved VO2max (34%), quadriceps CSA (10%), MVC (37%), whole muscle specific tension (25%), and concentric peak power (19%). These positive changes indicate that aerobic exercise may positively influence muscle size and function in the elderly.
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science
dc.format.extent vi, 57 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Muscles -- Physiology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Older women -- Physiology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Exercise -- Physiological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Cycling -- Physiological aspects. en_US
dc.title Age and muscle function : impact of aerobic exercise en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1391476 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5318]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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