The historical significance of The little house on the prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder : an honors thesis (HONRS 499)

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dc.contributor.advisor White, Ray (Raymond E.) en_US
dc.contributor.author Irvine, Elizabeth M. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-06T19:01:31Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-06T19:01:31Z
dc.date.created 1994 en_US
dc.date.issued 1994
dc.identifier.other A-153 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/190982
dc.description.abstract This thesis is a discussion of the historical significance of the series of children's novels written by Laura Ingalls Wilder. The purpose is to delve beyond the fact that the series was intended for children and look at the books topically. Topics analyzed include growing up in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, daily life, family ties, courtship, marriage, homesteading the American frontier, dangers of homesteading, building railroads, and education. A comparison will be drawn between Laura's descriptions and information found in outside sources in order to prove how historically accurate Laura's novels are.
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.format.extent 52 leaves ; 29 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh History. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ball State University. Honors College -- Theses (B.?.) -- 1994. en_US
dc.title The historical significance of The little house on the prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder : an honors thesis (HONRS 499) en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1245080 en_US


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5463]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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