Multimodality is-- : a survey investigating how graduate teaching assistants and instructors teach multimodal assignments in first-year composition courses

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dc.contributor.advisor Ranieri, Paul W.
dc.contributor.author Lutkewitte, Claire E. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-09T15:28:55Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-09T15:28:55Z
dc.date.created 2010 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/193450
dc.description.abstract This dissertation identifies if and how graduate teaching assistants and instructors working in the field of rhetoric and composition teach multimodal assignments in first-year composition (FYC) courses. The research questions for this study were as follows: 1) In what ways do graduate teaching assistants and faculty teach multimodal assignments in FYC courses? 2) Are graduate teaching assistants, adjuncts, and contract faculty equally as likely as assistant, associate, and full professors to teach multimodal assignments in FYC courses? 3) What kinds of training do graduate teaching assistants and faculty receive to prepare them to teach multimodal assignments in FYC courses? 4) Do graduate teaching assistants and faculty feel the kinds of training they receive adequately prepare them to teach multimodal assignments in FYC courses? If not, what needs to change? These research questions were investigated using a combination of online survey research methods and follow-up interviews. This study provides a broad and current analysis, as well as a reflective picture, of the teaching of multimodal assignments in FYC courses. As a result of quickly evolving technologies, instructors have potentially more opportunities to teach multimodal assignments. However, in some cases, writing program policies and curriculum limit or make it difficult for graduate teaching assistants and instructors to assign multimodal assignments in FYC courses. Thus, this study investigated the ways current graduate teaching assistants and/or instructors teach multimodal assignments despite difficulties and limitations. It also investigated whether or not graduate teaching assistants and instructors receive any training or help in shaping their multimodal pedagogy and whether or not they feel this training or help was adequate. The findings indicate instructors are more willing than their departments to implement multimodal composition pedagogy. The findings also show that instructors teach multimodal assignments in their classrooms in various ways, including the use of different technologies and resources. Evidence suggests that despite their desire for more help from their departments, instructors teach themselves how to use such technologies and resources to implement their multimodal composition pedagogy. The study concludes that how multimodal composition pedagogy is implemented in a writing classroom is more likely an individual instructor’s decision rather than a department’s decision.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of English
dc.format.extent vi, 237 p. : digital, PDF file, col. ill., col. map en_US
dc.source CardinalScholar 1.0 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh English language -- Rhetoric -- Study and teaching (Higher) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh English language -- Rhetoric -- Interactive media.
dc.title Multimodality is-- : a survey investigating how graduate teaching assistants and instructors teach multimodal assignments in first-year composition courses en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (Ph. D.) en_US
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1560841 en_US


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  • Doctoral Dissertations [3248]
    Doctoral dissertations submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University doctoral candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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