Effects of a modern environment on early puberty in humans : a comparative study of skeletal and published data of non-Hispanic blacks in the United States

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dc.contributor.advisor Bowers, Evelyn J.
dc.contributor.author Poulos, Mari K. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-09T15:33:35Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-09T15:33:35Z
dc.date.created 2009 en_US
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/193593
dc.description.abstract Studies in the United States suggest that girls are developing secondary sexual characteristics at earlier ages than in previous years, with non-Hispanic black girls in the United States experiencing menarche at an earlier age when compared to their peers. Early puberty and menarche may have multiple detrimental effects, including reduced adult height, increased risk of breast cancer, obesity, and endometrial cancer. In this thesis, data from published sources of height and skeletal information on non-Hispanic blacks dating from 1763 to 1861 in the United States are compared with modern population data from 1988 to 1994. The expected result is that the modern population should be taller than the historic population. This held true for males, but not for females. The sexes differed from each other in each population group. This could suggest that female maturation is under greater genetic control than male, compensating for harsh living conditions.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Anthropology
dc.format.extent v, 306 p. : digital, PDF file, ill. (some col.) en_US
dc.source CardinalScholar 1.0 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Menarche -- United States. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh African American teenage girls -- Health and hygiene.
dc.subject.lcsh Stature -- United States.
dc.subject.lcsh African Americans -- Anthropometry.
dc.title Effects of a modern environment on early puberty in humans : a comparative study of skeletal and published data of non-Hispanic blacks in the United States en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1540706 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5358]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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