Human movement : the transition of people through space and time

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dc.contributor.advisor Hannon, David T.
dc.contributor.author Johnes, Jonathan R. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-09T15:33:48Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-09T15:33:48Z
dc.date.created 2008 en_US
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/193614
dc.description.abstract The main goal of this creative project was to study the human figure and its relationship to its environment. In the process of exploring this idea, several key concepts became the focal point. First, the element of time was studied. The primary emphasis was the relationship between human figures and the passage of time. Second, working with figures on white backgrounds focused on each figure’s visual characteristics. Last, addressing elements of abstraction helped to control the mood of each piece. In terms of subject matter, everyday activities were the focus of the project. Every day we subject ourselves to routine behaviors, to which we eventually become desensitized. In this creative work these mundane activities are addressed in order to uncover unique qualities in the visual environments that often are overlooked. A variety of techniques derived from traditional processes were developed to explore these concepts, including embedding, paint carving, and encasing. An exploration of common imagery utilizing photography, along with visual references from various artists, were used to inform the processes developed for this project.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Art
dc.format.extent 50 p. : digital, PDF file, ill. (some col). en_US
dc.source CardinalScholar 1.0 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Figure painting. en_US
dc.title Human movement : the transition of people through space and time en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1427388 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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