Animation-Aided Learning and Education Technology Self-Efficacy in a College Population

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dc.contributor.author Clark, Jacquelin en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-13T15:13:34Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-13T15:13:34Z
dc.date.created 2008-05-03 en_US
dc.date.issued 2008-05-03
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/194214
dc.description.abstract As computer resources become more readily available to educational institutions, the ways in which students gather information using computers should be examined. This study compares educational content presented through a learner-controlled animation, continuous animation and static graphics and gauges any learning differences while measuring any moderating effects of educational technological self-efficacy. Participants in the continuous animation condition performed better on the post-test than participants in the learner-controlled condition, who performed better on the post-test than participants in the static graphics condition. Condition predicted performance on the post-test recall questions but did not reach significance on the comprehension or analysis questions. Except for the educational functioning sub-scale, the selfefficacy measure did not find efficacy levels as a predictor of test performance. en_US
dc.title Animation-Aided Learning and Education Technology Self-Efficacy in a College Population en_US


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  • Undergraduate Theses [28]
    Theses submitted to academic departments by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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