An Argument for Clarity: What are Learning Management Systems, What are They Not, and What Should They Become.

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dc.contributor.author Watson, William en_US
dc.contributor.author Watson, Sunnie Lee
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-13T15:17:05Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-13T15:17:05Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/194513
dc.description.abstract The application of computers to education has a history dating back to the 1950s, well before the pervasive spread of personal computers (Reiser, 1987). With a mature history and varying approaches to utilizing computers for education, a veritable alphabet soup of terms and acronyms related to computers in education have found their way into the literature, most of them non-standardized. Learning Management System (LMS) is one approach to the application of computers to education which holds great potential and important concepts yet is often misunderstood and the term misused. This article will clarify the use of the term LMS by presenting a history and definition of LMS, differentiating it from similar terms with which it is often confused, and discussing the role it can play in education. It will then describe current application and available features of LMSs, and conclude by identifying trends and recommending future research. en_US
dc.title An Argument for Clarity: What are Learning Management Systems, What are They Not, and What Should They Become. en_US


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