Interactions among weight status, weight perceptions, stress and dieting behaviors in female college students

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dc.contributor.advisor Chezem, Jo Carol
dc.contributor.author Hollman, Jennifer L.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-28T16:20:16Z
dc.date.available 2011-12-17T06:30:17Z
dc.date.created 2010-12-18
dc.date.issued 2010-12-18
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/194641
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this thesis was to determine relationships among dieting behaviors, stress, weight status, and weight perceptions in college undergraduate females. Individuals who were overweight/obese reported significantly higher eating in response to emotions and stress as well as reduced ability to change a situation, manage one’s emotional reaction, or cope effectively than their underweight/normal weight peers. Also, those who were overweight/obese used significantly more total methods for weight loss. Individuals who were more likely to use food to cope also used a higher number of restraint methods of dieting as well as non-diet methods than those who were less likely to use food to cope. Perceived healthy and perceived attractive weight, as percents of current weight, were significantly lower for overweight/obese individuals than for those who were underweight/normal weight. Results from this study illustrate that weight status is associated with dieting behaviors, emotional eating, and weight perceptions.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Family and Consumer Sciences
dc.subject.lcsh Reducing diets.
dc.subject.lcsh Stress (Physiology)
dc.subject.lcsh Body weight.
dc.subject.lcsh Women college students.
dc.title Interactions among weight status, weight perceptions, stress and dieting behaviors in female college students en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.date.liftdate 2011-12-17
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1629787


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  • Master's Theses [5454]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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